Tuesday, August 30, 2016

Made by a Fabricista: 70's Inspired Peasant Dress


I came of age in the 70's, and the Peasant Dress style made popular by Laura Ashley and Gunne Sax are near and dear to my heart!  I knew that it would just be a matter of time until they came back, and recently McCalls patterns introduced a Laura Ashley design with 7242.  The pattern has several different views, and I originally thought that I would make the short dress, but when I actually tried it on, it was screaming for the ruffle, so I added it at the last minute.




I didn't have quite enough fabric to make the full width of the ruffle, so mine is about 8", instead of 12" wide as the pattern is.  I also serge finished the ruffle hem instead of narrow hemming to save time and keep the ruffle as long as possible.




I wanted to make it with a true 70's vibe which meant soft flowy fabric in earthy or muted colors.
Fabric Mart had a challis that was just perfect for it with a Muted Teal and Fiery Orange Rayon Challis.


I haven't worked with challis for a while, because it is one of those fabrics that has a mind of it's own.  You know the kind- you can cut it absolutely on the pattern lines, and then you turn around, and it's completely shape shifted into a different piece!



It is however, incredibly soft and has the most beautiful drape, so if you can be patient with it, you will be rewarded.


When working with challis, make sure that you preshrink it, as it does have a tendency to shrink quite a bit. It also has a tendency to grow, so pieces like collars and facings especially need to be checked before you sew, as they might have relaxed and grown larger since you cut them.


I could tell that the dress was going to slip easily over my head, so I skipped the buttonholes, and just sewed the buttons through all layers.


I'm accenting it with cognac leather boots and gold accessories which help lend that 70's vibe.


I"m so happy with this dress and can't wait for the weather to cool down so that I can wear it! 

Happy Sewing!
Ann

Monday, August 29, 2016

Summer of T-Shirts Event: Bell Sleeves

This is the last week in the Summer of T-Shirts Event! We had a lot of fun putting this together for you and I hope it helped broaden your creativity.

If you followed along with us, be sure to post photos of your finished projects on Facebook and Instagram using #FMSummerofTshirts. You will be entered into a random drawing for one of two prizes: a $75 gift certificate for Fabric Mart or 3 patterns of your choice from Palmer/Pletsch or Melissa Watson. Post your photos by August 31st. Winners will be chosen on September 1st.

This week's post is by Tereza from the blog, Sewing For Me. She will be sharing with you how to change straight sleeves into bell sleeves.


I just can't get enough of my StyleArc Adele Top!



For this version, I took into account my changing body as my twins are reaching 20-ish weeks out of 40. With the changes, straight sleeves feel a little snug some days. Therefore, I drafted up 3/4 bell sleeves.



Step 1- Set up your sleeve pattern to 3/4 length.

Step 2- Establish your wrist width. In this version, I added 2" on either side at the sleeve hem then gently curved back to just below the armhole seam line. Leave that seam alone or you'll accidentally be adding to the armhole. Ask me how I know! You can see I free handed the curve so it took a few tries. If you have a hip curve ruler or French curve, use one of those.


Note: I taped my sleeve bell on top so it can be easily removed later. I always try to preserve the original pieces whenever possible.


Step 3- With the wings in place, draw one horizontal line with a straight edge matching the original sleeve cut line. Then draw a second line 1/2" below that.

Step 4- mark the center line of the sleeve over these new hemlines.



Step 5- Draw the new curved sleeve edge starting at the first line at the edges and the second line in the center. Again, a curved ruler makes it easier, but I free handed this curve as well. You can always adjust this during the hemming step if it end be up a little uneven.


Step 6- Now you just cut your new pattern piece out of the paper, and cut your fabric.

You can use the same bell technique on the front and back for a loose tent silhouette too!
I love how this fits! I want to make a few more now!

Saturday, August 27, 2016

Made By A Fabricista: Bomber Jacket Trend



I've wanted a bomber jacket for a few years now and what do you know, they are in style now in a major way!

I've been seeing lots of florals and lots of satin bombers. I knew I wanted mine to be a bit bold (for me) and when I saw this printed ponte, I decided a knit bomber jacket would be mine!


At the time, I wasn't buying new patterns (broke that fast - shhhhh!) and went for a stash pattern - Burda 2/2013 #125


It comes in sizes 34 - 42 (8 - 16) and needs just 1 1/4 yard of 55 inch fabric - score! I couldn't find ribbing locally so I went with a black ponte for the bands.

I wanted to line it and picked up a run-of-the-mill poly interlock knit in black. It's a bit shiny but it's okay; it serves the purpose.


I don't think I'll ever make another jacket again without a back facing!


I cut a size 40 at the neckline and shoulders, grading to a 42 for the rest. This is standard for me with Burda. After taking measurements, and because I was using a knit, I decided I didn't need a full bicep adjustment and that the blousing at the waist made a swayback adjustment unnecessary. Also, there is no interfacing in this jacket other than a 1" strip where the zipper is inserted. 

I really love the fit!


This went together so quickly (I used the serger for most of it) until it came time to figure out how to line, add zipper and add bottom band. I got myself all sorts of confused and Burda's instructions aren't all that helpful. I had attached the bottom band to the fashion fabric and then had no clue how I was going to attach the band to the lining!

In the end, I serged it as much as I could and slip-stitched the rest by hand. I also slip-stitched the bottom band to the zipper tape. For the sleeves, I just attached the band to the fashion fabric and lining at the same time.



I made my hem band a bit smaller than they suggested - both length and width, and skipped the topstitching on the neckline. With this busy print, it isn't missed! I did get those front pieces lined up nicely!!



While I find this print a bit wild and crazy; I absolutely adore the finished jacket! I love the fit and think this will be a fun wardrobe piece. 



Are you hopping on the Bomber jacket bandwagon this fall?!

Nakisha