Wednesday, January 17, 2018

Made By A Fabricista: Receiving Blankets for Baby Boy

 HI Fashionistas!

I am just one month away from my due date and this week I am working on getting my hospital bag ready and wrapping up any loose ends to be best prepared for when baby arrives.

I made a receiving blanket with a beautiful blue seersucker on one side and a soft flannel on the other side. It is such an easy DIY and I documented the steps to took to make this super simple DIY. Then I could not stop myself and made a second one with this fishbone embroidered seersucker.




Arent these so cute?

Here is what the flannel side looks like, which is soft and would face the babe


This is how I made the blanket:

I started with one yard of this seersucker fabric and this flannel fabric. The flannel is a shirting fabric. It is so soft and thick enough to be perfect for the blanket.


Step 1: I folded the fabric selvage to selvage, chopped it off along the fold and used one piece, and then trimmed down the edges to make sure it was a rectable with straight edges.   I cut the seersucker fabric first using its lines as a guide. Then I used the seersucker as a template to cut out the flannel.


Step 2: Placing the right sides of the fabric together, I sewed along all the 4 sides, leaving a 4 inch opening to easily be able to turn the blanket inside out (see bottom right of blacnket). I'll show this with the second blanket as it was a smaller cut and easier to photograph



Step 3: I turned the blacket right sides out, gave the blanket a good overall press, neatly tucking in the seam allowance on the 4 inch opening.

Step 4: I topstitched with a decorative stitch. In the process, I closed up the 4-inch opening.  I have to tell you that my domestic machine does not get a lot of use, but I have a makeshift studio set up in my closet at the moment.  It's hard to get into my studio these days, which is in the basemement.. so my brother machine is getting lots of attention!

Love the top stitching.. so cute!


I tested out a few decorative stitches before deciding on this one!





That is it for my latest DIY! The royal blue thread was already in my machine from this other sewing project I just completed a few days ago, my maternity dress for family pictures.... so that worked out perfectly. I am really digging all shades of blue lately.


I hope that you enjoyed reading this little DIY project of mine. I am going to attempt one more project, a robe/ duster before the baby arrives! I have the most beautiful  emerald green damask fabric picked out for that! I'll be working on that fairly soon.

Xoxo
-Vatsla from Fashion Behind The Seams



Saturday, January 13, 2018

Made by a Fabricista: Separates to mix and match!

For this month's post, I knew I wanted to use this gorgeous cobalt and black viscose and mohair woven to make something.... the question was what to do!  It is too cold where I live to make a dress that doesn't need some sort of jacket, sweater, etc., so I also ordered this beautiful super wash wool jersey in deep black.  


Sorry about the indoor photos.  Like most of the nation, we are in a deep freeze and the air temp just barely made it above zero degrees Fahrenheit today.  


That fun purple print is a sweater knit from my stash that I also purchased from FM quite some time ago.  The colors in it are just perfect with the cobalt and black.  Plus, I really to add some additional color in my life. 


All three fabrics sewed up dreamily.  Is that a word? 


Even though all three were awesome, the skirt is my favorite fabric.  I've never used a fabric with mohair in it and it just sewed and pressed beautifully.  This skirt will be a frequent rotation in my closet.


Here is a link to the McCall's pattern I used: Skirt pattern


Of course I lined this skirt and since this is a dark fabric, I decided to have some fun with a big pop of color!


I am not sure what I was doing there, but at least you can see the vibrant lining I used!  The lining is also from FM.




I like having the option to wear the long black cardigan with the skirt and top. 


I did mention to the hubby that I sort of felt like a librarian--no offence to any of you that may be a librarian, this is just very conservative.



I also wanted to be able to wear the cardi and sweater with other things, like jeans!  


This super wash wool is just light, warm, and wonderful to work with!


It drapes just beautifully!  To stabilize the hems, I used a notion that you can purchase on FM's site.  SeweyeKeys is amazing and works magic!  If you've never used it before, try it.  



If you are wondering, here are the patterns I used for the cardi and the top.  

On to the fabric--


Here is a close up of the skirt fabric and lining.  Dark colors are really hard to photograph.  


Here is another try at the skirt fabric.  


Here is a closer look at the sweater knit.  It feels like it has some wool in it and it again sewed up beautifully.


Here is a closer look at the cardigan made from the wool knit.  I decided to use a decorative stitch on the pocket edges.  

I enjoyed making these separates that I will wear together and apart.  

Happy New Year all!
Sue from Ilove2sew!

Wednesday, January 10, 2018

Made by a Fabricista: Dusty Lavender Duffle Coat


Baby, it's cold outside!  If you're in the northern hemisphere, you likely agree.  We've had some crazy sub-zero temperatures, haven't we?  But what better excuse than to make a cozy new coat!  This time, I chose a gorgeous dusty lavender wool/cashmere blend to make Simplicity 8470- a duffle style coat.  Fabric Mart has an incredible coating selection this year.  The fabric that I chose has sold out, but there are many more beautiful ones to choose from!

The reason that I chose this pattern was pure and simple- it had a hood!  I'm so surprised that very few coat patterns come with hoods!  Sure, hats are good, but when it is really cold and windy, nothing beats the protection of a hood.


I chose to line my hood with a silvery grey polyester fleece, just to turn up the warmth factor a little more.  Here you can see that the hood has a turn back cuff, and a center panel with topstitching detail.


And from the back, you can see the back yoke and center back seam.  I added 1" to the length of the body of the coat and to the sleeves.  I also did a substantial full bust adjustment, forward shoulder, round back and full bicep adjustment, which are all normal adjustments for me on a Big 4 pattern. 


The pattern also has some interesting pocket options.  I don't know about you, but I can never have enough pockets!  I chose to make the view with two lower and two upper pockets.  The lower ones are the perfect size for a cell phone, and the upper ones are just at the right spot for you to put your hands in.


I really love coats with toggles, but they aren't really very easy to find in fabric stores here.  So, I did a little searching and found Cosmosapparelwear on Etsy.  They have a wonderful selection of hand made toggles at reasonable prices.  The hardest part about using these toggles was getting them to stay in place before sewing.  The leather is too thick to put a pin through, and wonder tape was not strong enough to hold them in place.  So, I ended up using regular scotch tape to tape them place until I could get to the sewing machine.


I chose a lavender polyester satin for the lining.  I had a devil of the time with static electricity and this lining though.  It just wanted to grab on to everything it touched and not let go!  With the cold air, our humidity level has gone way down and static electricity has gone way up.  I think that I understand the reason now that some linings are labelled "anti-static". 


Even though I'm in love with my new coat, I have some misgivings about the pattern.  First, there is a drafting error in the lower back piece- it was drawn wider than the corresponding lining piece.  Luckily, I had read this on Patternreview before I started, so I was able to make the change to the pattern.  Second, the instructions for the pockets are odd  They show you actually covering up the bottom pocket with the top one, which I decided not to do, due to thickness of my fabric, and also for wanting to make the bottom pocket easier to use.  And third, the side front lining needs to be cut 1" shorter, but the only place that this is noted is in a very tiny sentence in the cutting layout section.  It should have been noted on the pattern piece, or at least in the directions section, as it is way too easy to miss where it is.  So, if you decide to try this pattern, take your time, and definitely make a muslin to make sure that the fit is good for you before cutting into good coat fabric.


I'm so happy with how this coat turned out.  It's one of my favorite colors, and I'm sure that I will be wearing this years from now!  If you haven't tried making a coat yet, I highly encourage you to take the plunge.  Not the polar bear plunge, mind you, just the coat making plunge!  Stay warm!

Happy Sewing and Happy 2018!
Ann