Saturday, August 19, 2017

Sew Over It Kimono - Maternity Style

As many of you can probably relate, finding maternity clothes can be a hard task! I don't want to spend a lot of money on them but I also need to be comfortable. And as my baby bump grows, my regular clothes are getting tighter and tighter. 

Thankfully as a sewist, I have the ability to sew maternity clothes that will fit and I will like. I have already remade the tops of a few over-the-belly pants and took older pairs of regular shorts and added an over-the-belly band. That's been helpful for sure! (I think the over-the-belly pants are so uncomfortable. I make my belly bands a little bigger while still holding my pants on me.)

Being the frugal person that I am, I REALLY don't want to make a lot of garments that will only be used in pregnancy (and for a time in post pregnancy.) I want things that I can adjust later to fit my new "regular" body. Therefore I have sewn a lot of tunics and dresses that have plenty of room to grow but will still be stylish afterward. 

As I looked through maternity clothing sites, I saw some kimono-style jackets and I fell in love. They looked so comfortable but stylish at the same time. And being that a kimono stays open, I can wear them no matter what my size!! 


Enter the Sew Over It Kimono Jacket....

I'm not even sure how I came across the pattern. I heard of Sew Over It, but had never made anything from their line before. The only thing I didn't like was that it was only available in PDF. Yuck. But I went with it. I'm not sure if it was the pattern or my printer, but there was a section of the PDF that was slightly off. The tester square measured correctly and most of the pieces matched up really well, but a small section was off about 1/4-1/2". Thankfully it was easy to draw out and fix what it should be. 


I used a fun retro floral print rayon crepe that I picked up from our pre-cut piece fabric deal earlier in the year. I love the color combination! I always think about rayon (challis especially) as being cool. This isn't. Yes, it could be my pregnancy hormones making me warmer but I thought this would have been a pretty cool fabric. Oh well, I still love it! 

Construction was pretty straight forward. The directions are easy to follow although I didn't pay attention to them too much. Definitely easy for a beginner to follow along. 


The only construction detail I did differently was that I squared off the front band at the hemline. The pattern calls for you to sew the front band to the kimono, then hem all the way around. I decided to fold the band right sides together at the hemline and sew till I met the printed fabric. Then clipped the corner and turned it right side out making a nice point. Then I sewed the hemline around the rest of the kimono. I did this because I thought it would drape nicely at the band and not have the chance of winging out. 


I loved the kimono so much that I'm making another! This time in a 4-ply silk from a NY designer. It's not available anymore, but if you were lucky enough to get a piece of it, you may want to try it for this too! I cut this one longer and used the self fabric for the band. While the silk kimono won't be as practical when I'm a mom, I can still wear it to work or out with hubby on a date night. Then quickly take off the jacket as soon as baby is with me! 

Speaking of baby -- he's growing every day and a very active little fellow! One more week till the 3rd trimester!


Have you sewn maternity clothes? Have any pattern suggestions for me?


Happy Sewing, 
Julie 


Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Made By A Fabricista: Seersucker for Summer

Hi Fashionistas!

I was so excited to sew with a beautiful yellow seersucker I found at Fabric Mart recently.  Here is the top I made:



You see, I have been the slowest to catch on to the cold shoulder trend. I know, its been around for a while and is continuing into fall fashions.  I was meeting my hubby for pizza one night and had some time to kill. So I decided to do some window shopping when I saw and tried on this RTW top.. and loved it. 


So.. I made a pattern... and found the perfect fabric.




And made my own version! I really do love the tent shape of this top. It is very different than the usual type of garments I make and wear, which typically tend to be more fitted.







The sleeves are so lovely.. here are some more pictures of the sleeve: 




I drafted a facing and modified the sleeves a bit by removing the band at the bottom and hemming them instead. 


I also made the straps a fixed length as opposed to adjustable.


Overall I am pretty happy with the way the top turned out.  I topstitched all around the neckline to ensure the facing was sitting down. 

I actually started making another version in a white cotton, but that one is still a work in progress. I may or may not get to wear that one this year!



I hope you enjoyed this make!  I am going to work on some maxi dresses next! Fall is coming!! Hope you are enjoying the cooler weather. I sure am!

See you soon

XOXO
-Vatsla from Fashion Behind The Seams


Saturday, August 12, 2017

Made by a Fabricista: A Little Fall Sewing

Are you a current-season sewer?  Or like me, do you also like to create some garments for the upcoming season?  I like to do both!  For this month, I wanted to make a few transitional garments and when I found this gorgeous boucle, I knew exactly what I wanted to make! 


 Unfortunately the fabric I used is sold out, but here are some other options for you: Boucle Fabric

 


One of the things that make boucle fabrics so wonderful to work with is the natural fiber content(s). I am a huge fan of using natural fibers when I can and this one is a wool and cotton blend. (Although you can find some beautiful boucle fabrics with synthetic blends too.)


Here are links to the two patterns I used:


Both called for the use of Boucle so it was a win-win!



For the jacket, I interlined the entire body of the garment using fusible mediumweight Pellon interfacing. I chose against interlining the sleeves and am happy with that decision.  

                         

I did make some pattern adjustments for fit:
1.  Sloping shoulder adjustment
2.  Sleeve cap adjustment--this pattern has an unbelievably large sleeve cap and despite my best efforts, it was too much so I shaved some off to get this to look right
3.  Swayback adjustment   
   
   
  

To give this a more professional look, I added some interlinings:
1.  Used multiple layers of woven interfacing cut on the bias in the sleeve cap area to keep it from collapsing.  In addition to the 2 layers of interfacing, I also cut one layer of hair canvas.  This also supported the sleeve head and gave it what it needed so the sleeve didn't collapse.  
2.  Cut the self-bias tape 1/4" wider to give a bit more turn-under room.  


Styling changes: 
1.  I've made this jacket before and even though I love it, I don't think I need two jackets with self fringe on them. I eliminated the fringe, but added a bias-cut center front section. 
2. Since the skirt has self-fringe, I decided not to over do the fringe on the jacket. Too much is simply too much! 
3.  I used complimentary denim fabric for the trim on the jacket.  


Did you see my lining?  It is by Maggy London, also purchased from FM.  I truly wish I'd purchased about 10 yards of this!  I love the colors and cute linings make me happy!  

I can't tell you how pleased with how well this turned out!  I feel like it is a modern 'suit' that will be perfect worn together or as separates.  

Thanks for reading!  
Sue from Ilove2sew