Saturday, October 28, 2017

Made by a Fabricista: Fall Denim Jumpsuit


I love a jumpsuit! Second to dresses, I think jumpsuits are my favorite item to sew. One piece outfits just make life easier. Plus jumpsuits are great for transitional months as you can layer them with a jacket or over a long sleeve shirt. And since I'm moving to fall sewing this jumpsuit was a timely sew.



I ordered this Aegean Blue Rayon/Tencel Chambray with plans to sew Simplicity 8214 but then debated switching to either McCalls 7577 or Simplicity 8426. So I did what I usually do when I have a sewing dilemma, I went to Instagram (if you don't follow me you should- TipStitched) and took a poll. Overwhelmingly the response was in favor of S8426!

Simplicity Pattern 8426 Misses' & Plus Size Jumpsuit by Mimi G

I love denim (or any fabric that has a denim look) and this chambray has a beautiful medium wash denim coloring. It feels great and is lightweight without being see-thru. It also has a crispness to it, thought I suppose that will soften with wear and washing. Though the raw edges did need to be finish it did not fray terribly while sewing.



The pattern instructions are clear, but if more clarity is needed all Mimi G patterns have an accompanying sew along video to walk you through the process. I didn't have any issues with the construction of the jumpsuit itself, but I did have a few issues with the fit.



Let me first say that the issues may be more specific to my body than say to the cut of the pattern. I have definitely put on more weight recently and all my weight goes to my midsection. That said I needed a 18 to accommodate my waist, even though my bust only warranted a 16. As we all know it's easier to take it than to let out so I cut the entire piece as a 18, especially since the pants were wide legged and I didn't have to worry about my hip measurement.

This shows a little over 1" but I let it out a bit after.

After sewing the straight 18 I tried it on and realized the bodice was loose in the bust area. I ended up taking the bodice in by 3/4" at the top grading back the SA at the waist on both sides to create a snug fit. I transferred this change to my lining pieces as well. (Looking at it in photos a 1/2" would have been and closer to a size 16)


Next I moved on to attaching the bodice yoke. At this point I tried it on again to check the bodice length as other sewists on Instagram had informed me it was too long. Sure enough the bodice on me was about 1/2" too long which was not flattering at all. I ended up detaching the bodice, removing 1/2" from the bottom and then reattaching to the pants. Thankfully that did the trick.


I also received some feedback about the crotch being too low, but that was not an issue for me, especially after I adjusted the bodice length. (If anything it's a smidge too high). I love the wide leg, but I'm not sure about the slight flare. Next time I think I'll straighten the legs out. Thankfully since the pants were so long once I made length adjustments the flare was lessened. I'm average height (5' 5") and I cut off 1" and sewed a 1" double fold hem. As you can see in the photos they are still quite long as I have on 5" wedges in these photos.


Though I did have to make some adjustments to the bust, bodice length and hem length I'm really pleased with this jumpsuit. I received a couple of compliments on it when I ran out to take these photos and run errands. I also want to buy a few more yards of this tencel chambray, as I write this there are 28 yards left.

What is your favorite type of piece to sew? Dresses? Tops? Skirts?

Did you like this post? If so, check out my blog, TipStitched.

Wednesday, October 25, 2017

Made By A Fabricista: My New Favorite Fall Wool Coat

Hi- 

Hope all is well!  Well it’s that time of year again...fall wardrobe time!  Or shall I say “sewing up” your fall wardrobe time?  I have been busy sewing up as much as I can, before I miss out on the cooler temperatures coming our way in Las Vegas.  One "to sew" item on my list is a coat; therefore, when I saw this canary yellow wool melton coating (although I refer to this as "mustard-colored") from Fabric Mart, I jumped at the opportunity to get some of it.  Right away, I knew I wanted to make Simplicity 8469.  I like a few views of this pattern, but with this fabric I chose to make View A. I must say this is a relatively easy coat pattern to sew and I enjoyed making it.


This is my first time sewing with wool melton and the texture reminds me of felt.  I wasn’t sure how to pre-treat this fabric, so initially, I pressed and gave it a good steam.  As I was doing this, a lot of lint was coming off the fabric.



Then it occurred to me that if I put the fabric in the dryer on low to medium heat, perhaps I could get more lint to come off.  So I hung my fabric up and evenly sprayed it with water and threw it in the dryer with a couple of my lavender dryer sheets.  There was quite a bit of lint in the lint trap, but the fabric came out beautifully.  I read online that this fabric will continue to develop lint balls for awhile, but with more wear the amount of lint will decrease overtime.  In the meantime, I will just keep a lint shaver handy.



To sew this I used a size 80 or 90 universal needle and I switched to a size 60 or 70 microtex needle to sew my lining, because the lining fabric was a bit fragile.  Initially, I was going to use a neutral colored lining that I found in my stash.  Before pre-treating the lining, I cut the pocket lining out, so I could continue working while the lining was in the washing machine. 

 

Unfortunately, the rest of the neutral lining was ruined in the washing machine.  It developed some sort of stain pattern throughout that was very noticeable in person.  It may have been damaged by the detergent or it may have been a dry clean only fabric.  I think it was given to me, so I can’t say for certain what the proper care instructions should have been.  Therefore, I put my coat project on hold until I could figure out what lining to go with.  After thinking, thinking, and more thinking...one night as I was falling asleep, it’s like a voice in my head screamed LEOPARD PRINT!!!  Of course, this was the best way to go!  



The great news is I had about 4 to 5 yards of leopard print fabric that I picked up a few years ago.  I was never able to decide what I wanted to make with it.  I am a leopard print fanatic, seriously! I have so many items in leopard print, right down to my Snuggie!  So this fabric was special to me and I was saving it for just the right thing!  




Now I must say after sewing with this leopard print fabric, I feel that it is best suited for lining, but it didn’t stop me from making a quick blouse with the leftover.  I made it with Simplicity 8216, View C, which is a pattern I won’t make again, but it really did work for this look!  Go check out my blog to see the blouse without the coat on and read about my little mishap, that turned out okay.

While getting sewing tips for wool melton, I came across a tip that said you really don’t need to use interfacing with this fabric, because of its weight and stability.  I was a little skeptical, so I asked a sewing veteran, Carolyn from Diary of a Sewing Fanatic, for a little advice while chatting on Instagram DM.  She said that I should use interfacing in my facing or it would collapse, she recommended woven interfacing, silk organza, or cotton batiste/twill.  I went to my local fabric store and found a “cotton organdy” which I thought seemed similar to her suggestions after discussing with a couple of the ladies in the store.  It was my first time using sew-in interfacing and I am ADDICTED to using it for jacket/blazer/coat facings.  I have already used sew-in interfacing again in a blazer project that I completed.  I love not getting the shrinkage and bubbling from the fusible interfacing that I use normally.  I was confident that my local fabric store would carry the silk organza interfacing that Carolyn suggested, so I stalled on ordering it for this coat.  However, I still want to order some to have on hand for the next great fabric.




I used magnetic snaps for the closures and these snaps are so great, because they just "automatically" snap into place.  They are also very easy to un-snap to allow the coat to be worn open.  Most of the times I like to wear my coat open, unless it is really cold outside.





I have mentioned on my Instastories that I don’t split, open up, or trim down darts even if they are big, BUT this fabric was so thick that it was necessary for me to split the darts open on this coat.  (Okay pardon my lighting in some of these pictures coming up below, but hopefully you are able to see the details.)



I had a little fun with top stitching, which actually served two purposes...1) to keep the bulky seams in place and 2) to add a little extra detail to the design.







For the sleeve, I wanted to double-over the wool fabric to make the bell portion, but I did not have enough fabric to do it.  I wasn’t interested in lining it per the instructions, so I cut them as single pieces and finished it with neutral bias tape.




I want to make this coat again, but in View C.  It would be amazing to have the cap sleeve version of this coat to wear with long sleeve shirts and turtlenecks for a cool fall evening.

Well, that's all I have for this post, until next time take care. Don't forget to check out my blog for more details on the blouse!


Yours truly, Tee

Maggie Elaine Blog


Saturday, October 21, 2017

Q&A: Meet Our Newest Fabricista, Marica!

Winner of the 2017 Fabricista Fashion Challenge!



Marica is a simple island girl, born in Jamaica and raised in Miami, Florida. She enjoys the gift of motherhood with her pair Aiden and Arielle.  Her passion is to touch lives whether in the classroom as an educator or inspiring someone to live in the moment. In her spare time, she enjoys spending quality time with her children, traveling, sewing and self expression through writing. 

What is your day job? 
My 9 to 5 is in the field of education.  I am currently a Middle Grade Mathematics teacher.  I am also a contributor for the Outlook Magazine - Jamaica Gleaner (here).

What is your dream job?
My dream career is to become a travel journalist.  I truly enjoy traveling, writing and learning about difference cultures.

What do you sew in your sewing room?




I love to make simple, chic garments for my daughter and me.  I hope to start sewing for son as well.  In addition to making clothes, I have a passion for simple DIY projects, making pillow covers, shams and pillow cases.


What is your favorite part of your sewing room?
I must say my favorite part of my sewing room is the corner where my sewing machine is located.  I also enjoy reading the inspiration quotes located in my sewing area as a daily reminder to enjoy this journey - life.

Give us an organizational tip:
I organize my fabric stash in tubs based on seasons. I currently have a Winter/Fall and Spring/Summer tub.  In addition, I have my planned makes for the month organized by patterns in a storage container.  I also organize my patterns by brand in numerical order.

When/How did you learn to sew?
I started sewing in High School in the early 90s.  I enjoyed sewing rather than cooking and fell in love.  Unfortunately, when I left high school, I gave it up.  I decided 3 years ago, to find a hobby that was therapeutic after losing my dad.  I decided to take a refresher lesson over a weekend and then used You Tube and blog to continue my sewing journey.

How much time do you spend in your sewing room?
For the most part, I only get to sew on weekends due to my hectic weekday schedule.  I will spend anywhere from 8-15 hours (Friday to Sunday) depending on the project(s).


Give us three words that describe your sewing style: Funky, chic and classic


Where do you get your inspiration for your projects?
My inspiration comes from a variety of sources.  I love art so I love working with vibrant colors and fabric that tells a story.  I then look at magazines, movies, fashion bloggers and sewist and draw my inspiration from a combination of sources and make the pattern or creation my own.

What was your first successful project?
My first successful project was in October 2014,  an elastic waist skirt for my daughter.
If you could pass along only one piece of sewing advice, what would it be?
The best advice I will share is that when failures come your way, use it as an opportunity to learn and grow.  


Thanks for stopping by! 

Follow my journey at:  Overdrive After 30

Marica will be blogging every 3rd Saturday of the month. 
Be sure to check back to see her first project, Saturday November 18th!

Wednesday, October 18, 2017

Made By A Fabricista: Mommy and Me in Vibrant Florals!

Hi Fashionistas:

I hope you are well and enjoying the cooler temperatures of fall.  I truly enjoyed watching the Fabric Mart sewing challenge in the month of September and did quite some sewing myself!

My latest project has been this beautiful dress for my darling daughter and a shawl for me to match.





The fabric I ordered was this one. It is sold by the panel and I got 3 panels.  They only have 8 panels left as I type this. The fabric is a shantung and was so lovely to work with. 

For Jasmines dress, I drafted a bodice and free handed the skirt. The bodice is self-lined, but on the inside of the bodice, I used the wrong side of the fabric as the correct side, as it is much softer and acted as lining. The skirt is unlined. 



Now moving on to what I made for myself. I am that person that is always cold. Initially, I had decided to make a chunky cowl neck using a sweater knit and adding a panel of the fabric to it, but I ended up with a shawl, which is actually a lot more practical as I will get a lot more use out of it. 


For my shawl. I used some leftover fabric I had from this dress I made a long time ago. 

The shawl is basically a rectangle with a panel of the shantung topstitched on. The four sides of the sweater knit are serged. 


I haven't shared this on my blog yet, energy has been limited, but I am expecting my 2nd little munchkin in February! Here he is making his debut!



Here are the back of out garments and her side view



I'm always going to cherish these mommy and me moments with Jazz. I started sewing for her when she was one, I cannot believe she is already four! As a mum, you always feel like you are missing out.. I am pretty certain I will be an old lady one day with a lot of handmade girl clothes I am never able to give away. 


Well, I hope you enjoyed spending some time with me and reading about my sewing adventures. Hope all is well in your world. That you are happy and peaceful and that you are enjoying the feeling of fall. I am looking forward to making my next project. Thinking of an unstructured drapey coat. And you? Let me know what you are working on next!

XOXO- Vatsla from Fashion Behind The Seams