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Showing posts from February, 2013

Resource Library: Sewing Thread

As a sewer, we all use thread. Whether we're using it for hand-sewing or putting it into our machine, we are very familiar with thread. But when using it, we tend to not think about how it is made and what fibers it can come in. I've done a lot of research on thread and I would love to share it with you! 

Thread is a tightly twisted strand of two or more plys of yarn. It is used to sew together garments, accessories and more. A collection of yarns (or threads) is also used to weave together fabric, whether it is woven or knitted. 
Thread comes in a variety of materials. As a "common" sewer, many of us are used to polyester or polyester/cotton threads. But threads also come in wool, silk, and many other contents.
NATURAL FIBERS: 1. Animal: wool, silk, hair
2.Plant (vegetable): cotton, flax, jute, wool, bamboo, etc.


MAN-MADE FIBERS: 1.Regenerated Cellulose: rayon, acetate
2.Mineral: glass, metallic
3.Synthetic: polyester, nylon, acrylic, elastic, polypropylene, etc.



How is Thre…

Resource Library: Tulle

Tulle is an open-construction fabric made using three kinds of yarns. In the following image (green) warp yarns running with the selvedge are looped by (blue) warp yarns that run diagonally.

At the same time another set of (purple) weft yarns loop the warp yarns and cross the opposite blue weft yarns.

A Hexagonal design is produced by (warp) yarns and the two kinds of (weft – filling) yarns running diagonally. The regular even tension given to the yarns produces a firm, stiff netting called tulle. When fabric is relaxed, a hexagonal shape is evident. The fabric is starched to help it hold it design and produces a wiry, crisp hand.

Tulle was first made as a foundation of laces in 1806 when John Heathcoat of Nottingham, United Kingdom (see Lace post)  was trying to adapt his machine for lace production. Tulle netting is still the foundation of many laces.
Tulle is still produced in Heathcoat’s Bobbinette machines which produces the highest quality of tulle. It holds its shape, and  pr…

Sew Along: Sewing the muslin

Have you ever used a PDF pattern before? This is my first time using one and I'm a little nervous about the instructions because they do not have picture diagrams. However, ohhh Lulu does and instructional blog posts on their website to help guide you through the process. I am sure I will be visiting those often! 
For those who are not familiar with PDF patterns I thought I would elaborate on the process.  A PDF pattern is often bought online and you receive the pattern by email. You save the document to your computer and then print following the instructions written by the seller.
Independent pattern designers typically use this method. 


You will print the pattern out and cut off the margins if instructed to do so.  From there you piece the pattern together following the grid system, placing matching letters and numbers side by side. (B1 is matched to B1, remember to check each side to make sure they match)
The pattern will start to come together and look like a regular tissue p…

Feature: Garnish Apparel

As wholesale manager, I have the opportunity to meet some really fun fashion designers. I grow a business and personal relationship with many and love to support their efforts! One of my (MANY) favorites is Erica Lurie, owner of Garnish Apparel. 


Erica has so graciously accepted the invitation to be featured on our blog. She just finished a new collection, entitled, "White Label Collection." This collection is quite different from her regular line of garments, but still oh so tempting! The best thing about her designs is that everything is Handmade in the USA! Along with a team of talented sewers, they sew the entire line in Portland, OR. The images scattered through this post are part of the White Label Collection. Enjoy and don't forget...support local and support indie design!


What is behind your business name?  Garnish means to adorn or decorate.  One of the most immediate ways of expressing our personalities is by our choices in how we adorn ourselves.  So our dress …

Feature: Pamela's Patterns

Have you been working with commercial patterns and not getting the results you want? Well if you feel this way, you need to try Pamela's Patterns! Pamela Leggett, creator of Pamela's Patterns, has been teaching how to sew since 1981. She specializes is pattern fitting which is clearly seen in her line of patterns, which are made to fit more like ready-to-wear clothes.

In 2012, she was proud to bring the Palmer/Pletch Sewing School to the east coast. Along with Pati Palmer herself, she taught the classes at Steve's Sewing, Vacuum and Quilting in King of Prussia, PA. The main Palmer/ Pletch Sewing School is located at Fabric Depot in Portland, OR. 
In keeping with our theme of everything Valentine's, Love and Lace, we especially wanted to feature Pamela's pattern entitled, UnMentionables Worth Mentioning. This pattern is for the "unmentionables" aka undergarments! She includes a pattern for a cami-illusion, slip and panties.


The cami-illusion can be made fr…

Inspiration: Valentine's Day Decorations

Valentine's Day is one of my personal favorites because I love the simple heart decorations, the flowers, the cake, and the shades of pink and red. I especially love how all of the decorations can be made by hand. Here are a few ideas you can make yourself: Sweet Little Hearts bed decor Floral Heart Heart Whoopie Pies Paris Valentine's Day Love Letters Valentine Mittens Made With Love Cookie Jar Love Tea Pink Cake  Treat Bags Pink Milkshake Painted Vases


Happy Valentine's Day! Love, Fabric Mart 

Made by a Fabricista: Sewing a Men's Button-down Shirt

I'm sure you've heard the phrase, "The way to a man's heart is through his stomach." Well this is very true with my husband. But I also think that making things for someone shows that you really care because you're taking time to do something for someone else. 

My husband needed some new button-down shirts for work, so I decided that I would make some for him. I had three different shirting fabrics and a pattern in my stash, I just needed to sit down and do it! So I made a vow that I was going to start and finish all three of these shirts before I worked on any other project. (Haha, how many of us say that?!) I used McCall #6044 and three different cotton shirtings I bought from Fabric Mart a few years ago.




The first shirt I cut out in size large because that's "what the pattern told me to do." I knew that when I make clothing for myself I never make my ready-to-wear size, so I was expecting the same thing here. When my husband tried the shirt on,…