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Sew Along: Sewing the muslin

Have you ever used a PDF pattern before?
This is my first time using one and I'm a little nervous about the instructions because they do not have picture diagrams. However, ohhh Lulu does and instructional blog posts on their website to help guide you through the process. I am sure I will be visiting those often! 

For those who are not familiar with PDF patterns I thought I would elaborate on the process. 
A PDF pattern is often bought online and you receive the pattern by email. You save the document to your computer and then print following the instructions written by the seller.
Independent pattern designers typically use this method. 



You will print the pattern out and cut off the margins if instructed to do so. 
From there you piece the pattern together following the grid system, placing matching letters and numbers side by side. (B1 is matched to B1, remember to check each side to make sure they match)

The pattern will start to come together and look like a regular tissue paper pattern. 
Once you have all the pieces taped together, you cut it out like normal. 

And ta-da!
You have a pattern! 

A few benefits to using PDF patterns are: 

  1. You can reprint the pattern. Messed up? Need a different size? Missing a piece? Don't worry!
  2. You print the pattern on printer paper, so you have sturdy patterns that you can use time and time again. 
  3. You can cut out your specific size without fear. On a regular tissue pattern, I cut for the largest size and fold down to my actual size, which I find to be rather annoying but in the long run beneficial because I can use that pattern for multiple sizes later. 

With PDF patterns, if I need a different size later, I can reprint and not have to repurchase!
I began sewing with first making the panties and bra from scraps.
Because I decided to make separates, I followed the cut lines on the pattern.
However when I cut them into seperates, I lost some information from the pattern that I discovered I would later need when pinning the garment together. So, now I know, write what pieces they are on the pattern before throwing the cut outs away!
Simple concept, but sometimes the excitement of a new project distracts me from obvious conclusions.
The panties were a breeze to pin together and stitch.
However I had more difficulty with the bra and felt confused on how to form the cup and piece the bra together, which is a part I have struggled with on other patterns. Luckily this pattern company has blog post instructionals on how to make this pattern. I visited and I'm ready to make another attempt at pieceing together the bra portion.

In the meantime, I think I am ready to cut out the pattern on the actual fabric I intend to use.
Wish me luck!
 



Comments

  1. Replies
    1. The shop of the pattern we are using: http://www.etsy.com/shop/ohhhlulu?ref=seller_info

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