Thursday, November 29, 2012

Sew Along: Making a Winter Coat

I've always wanted to make a winter coat. I tried my hand at a blazer about 10 years ago, (I was about 16 at the time) but didn't like the way it turned out. That ended up in the trash.... I'm a little older now and have learned a lot more about sewing, so I'm ready to take it on! I will be using Simplicity #2311. I wanted to make a classic-style coat that is timeless and stylish. 

Simplicity #2311
For the fabric, I chose a Burberry-inspired plaid wool coating. Of course I had to choose something that will make this project just a little bit harder, but I'm really excited to learn how to match plaids! I had this fabric in my stash, although it is from Fabric Mart. We had it on our website last year. 


For the lining I will be using an Italian silk crepe de chine from our website (CWD4232 - Italian Crepe de Chine in Navy). I will be making the coat extra warm by interlining it with cotton flannel and will be using a weft-interfacing. 

CWD4232 - Italian Crepe de Chine in Navy 
Before I cut out any of the pattern pieces from the good fabric, I will be sewing up a muslin. I do not usually create a muslin because I'm too impatient. BUT I do not want to mess this up. I've already cut out the pattern pieces from my muslin and hope to start working on it over the weekend.

I've been doing a lot of research on this pattern. I really enjoy using Pattern Review to see what others have to say about the pattern. While researching on Pattern Review, I came across a blog that also featured her process in sewing this coat pattern -- Notes from a Mad Housewife. I immediately fell in love with Lisa's blog. She has a lot of insight on what steps to make to complete a beautiful winter coat. She just finished her version of the coat, check it out here. I got the idea to interline with cotton flannel and to use weft-interfacing from her blog also.

Any advice on how to match plaids? I've only done it on a small scale, so this is a HUGE jump for me!

~Julie

Tuesday, November 27, 2012

Inspiration: Our Picks for Winter Coats 2012

Are you ready to make a new coat this winter? 
Here are a few ideas including our favorite coat patterns for this season paired with our fabric recommendations from Fabric Mart.



1. How about a fancy brocade coat for festive occasions? 
 Vogue 8804
1.   CDA5479       2.  CAD5591


2. Or a relaxed fit wool flannel coat? 
 Vogue 8539
 3.  BIB5538    4.   BTA4718


3.What about a luxurious velvet coat? 
 Vogue 8465

 5.  UWB4899   6.  BAD2653


4.Mix fun wool shetlands and prints!
7.   BLC5402     8.   BIA5401


5. Make an elegant vintage coat with gorgeous cashmere. 
 Vogue 1083

9.   SPD5683     10.  CAA5552


6. Here's a cute crop jacket from Colette Patterns. Use melton wool in a rich color or classic black. 

 11.  BEA4951ET     12.   SKD5408


7. Looking for something more modern? Use melton or a beautiful mohair.

 13.   CYF800     14.   BBB4952ET



8. This jacket would look great in suede!

15.    MKB4613    16.  CVI2041




Already working on a coat?
Show us what you are working on by emailing us at fabricmartblog@gmail.com
Send us a picture of the fabric and pattern you chose, or your finished coat.
We always love to see and share what you are working on!

Stay tuned to see what coats we are making! 



Tuesday, November 20, 2012

Inspiration: Dreaming about Velvet ?

We are loving the luxurious ways you can use velvet. 
We collected our favorites and couldn't wait to share them with you! 

Need to snazz up your office? How lovely is this Velvet Office with a velvet chair and bench?

Here's a cute Velvet Skirt for a young lady. Add some length and anyone can wear it!
Add a flair of vintage to your living room with a  Silk Velvet Pillow.
Cover notebooks with velvet. Velvet Books make great gifts!
Think velvet shorts are too difficult of a look to pull off? 
Just pair Velvet Shorts with dark tights for a high-fashion-look perfect for early fall weather.

 Velvet Bow Ties are great as gifts for the guy that loves a bow tie or dress up the groomsmen at a winter weddings.
Make a Velvet Quilt for your winter duvet cover.



Here are a few velvets that would be perfect for these projects!


 1.  MNE2126    2.  MCE5429    3.  MED5388    4.   CFC4631     5.  MAC4502     6.  MBB5279

Thursday, November 15, 2012

Velvet, Velveteen and Velour

Velvet  is distinguished from other flat textiles by its pile or nap weave. The unique texture is created by an extra set of lengthwise yarns in addition to the warp yarn needed to weave the background of the fabric. When forming loops with this extra set of yarns on the face of the fabric the density, weight and texture of the fabric is being modified. After the fabric is woven the pile or nap is cut and many modifications can be done recreating a finishing or pattern.

Uncut Pile

Cut Pile


Velvet: the whole set of warp nap is cut to obtain an erected pile or upright pile. This is when the yarn is standing up.


1. MFD5387      2. MED5388     3. MCA5428


Panne Velvet: once the pile is cut it is pressed into one direction to obtain a flattened pile that is laid in one direction giving a shimmering appearance.

    
4.  CYE5447     5.  MAD4877

Crushed Velvet (Mirror V.) has the nap pressed into different directions.


6.  MAB4869    7.  MAD4501


Print Velvet: Print on nap of the velvet. Modern recreation of brocading velvet and jardinière velvet, brocaded velvet had patterns woven with metallic (gold) yarns while jardinière velvet was woven with satin ground pattern multicolored design and made with pile of varying height and cut and uncut loops.

Burnout or Stamped Velvet: different methods are applied either to burn or dissolve the pile into patterns. When burn with metallic hot cylinders it is called stamped velvet, when dissolved by chemicals it is called Burnout. For commercial purposes either one is called Burnout Velvet.


     
8.  MBB5279     9.   MBC5360     10.  SMC5545


Nacre Velvet: The back of one color and pile of another, so that it has changeable pearly appearance.


11.  MFA4878


Velvet drapes gracefully depending on the background weave, the material used for its construction the thickness of its pile and the finished applied to it.

Velvet can be made out of multiple materials: Silk, Rayon, Acetate, Polyester, Cotton, 
or the blend of two or more of them.


Velveteen is known for being the cotton version of velvet. When Velveteen appeared around 1810, it was originally woven with an extra set of filling yarns instead of warp yarns. There were also some versions made out of cotton that would include interlocked rows of pile and woven filling yarns, which gave the fabric a different appearance and texture.

Velveteen keeps its body making it unique; with a beautiful subtle lustrous would make warm, textured bottom weights, jackets, coats, waistcoats and accessories.


12.  MNE2126    13.  BLB3195     14.   UWB4899


Velour (French word for velvet) is the knitted version of velvet. Innovations of fabrics bring us this fashionable fabric that is very versatile springy (or stretchy), acceptable for dancewear, sportswear, loungewear, fashionable sleepwear, it is often used to make cardigans, tunics and tops suitable for formal occasions and office wear.

Velour can be made of polyester, acetate, cotton, and rayon or blended.


15.  BQB5353      16.  BEB5333       17.  SWD4724        18.   BOC5354




On a regular velvet loom, two single cloths are woven face-to-face, one above the other, with each pile end interlacing first with one fabric and then the other. Afterwards, the pile is cut automatically on the loom by a knife that travels back and forth through the center of the pile, separating the upper and lower fabrics into two single cloths.

On a wire loom the yarns loop over the wire forming the pile, and as each wire is withdrawn its knife cuts the loop, producing the cut pile.

(Filling yarns are considered to be the yarns running selvedge to selvedge (crosswise), while warp yarns are considered to be the yarns going with the selvedge (lengthwise).

~ Gabby ~

Sources: 
A Pocket Dictionary of Weaving Terms for Today's Weaver by Madelyn van der Hoogt  
Understanding Fabrics by Learning Seed
5,000 years of Fibers and Fabrics by M.D.C. Crawford

Tuesday, November 13, 2012

DIY Tutorial: Embossing on Velvet with Rubber Stamps

With the holidays fast approaching, it is time to start thinking about gifts for the holidays! Velvet is a popular fabric around the holidays and there is a really fun project you can make with velvet and rubber stamps. It is super easy and a lot of fun.






You will need: 
- Velvet (Silk/Rayon, Rayon/ Acetate or 100% Acetate Velvet with a nap)
- Rubber stamp of your choice
- Iron
- Ironing board
- Water spritzer bottle






1) Preheat your iron to the cotton/ wool setting. Iron any creases out of the velvet.

2) Place the rubber stamp face up on the ironing board. Spritz the rubber stamp with water. It should just be damp. Pat with a paper towel to remove any beaded water from stamp. Lay the velvet, right side down, onto the stamp making sure it is in the place you want it. Spritz some water on the velvet. Do not saturate it.



3) Place the iron on the fabric/stamp, holding it in place for about 10-20 seconds. Hold the iron as flat as possible. Try not to teeter the iron back and forth, otherwise you will get imprints from the edges of the mounting block.

4) Lift up your iron. If you see a faint imprint of the stamp on the back side of the fabric, it is finished! Another way to tell that it is finished is you should not see water residue on the back of the fabric. If you see some, place the iron back on the stamp for about 5 more seconds.





5) Now it is time to reveal the magic! Carefully pull up the fabric from the stamp. You should see an iridescent imprint on the velvet!



Few Tips: 
- It is best to use a new, clean rubber stamp. I really wanted to use the peacock feather stamp, and only had a used one. If you want to use a used stamp, clean it thoroughly. Otherwise when you spritz it with water, the dye will come off on your velvet.

- Other types of stamps can be used, but test on scrap velvet first. Unmounted rubber stamps will work well. The foam stamps shown in the supplies picture can be used, but use with care, as you do not want them to melt onto the velvet.


I was curious to see how velveteen and stretch velvet (polyester/ lycra) would work out with this technique.
Here is what I found:

Embossing on Velveteen (100%  Cotton) 


The embossed area turned out nice, but there is not as much of a sheen. The left picture, the holly berries, also shows an imprint of the mounting block. This is why I would not recommend the foam stamps, unless you are going to hold your iron straight when pressing on the stamp. The peacock stamp turned out nicely.


Embossing on Stretch Velvet (Polyester/ Lycra)


I did not personally like the way the design turned out on the stretch velvet. Some of the design showed up, but the eye of the peacock was not defined. I would not recommend using stretch velvet.

Once you found the stamp and fabric you want to use, think of all the gifts you can make using this technique. Imagine a beautiful scarf with embossing all-over. Make a velvet blouse and adorn the bottom of the sleeves with embossing. Or try the same thing on the bottom of a skirt! And one last idea---make a Christmas stocking with embossed velvet. The possibilities are endless. How are you going to use this for the holidays?

~ Julie