Skip to main content

Made By A Fabricista: I'm Bringing the 70's Back, Missoni Style!


[Model is my daughter Mori]

I wasn't born in the 70's but I lived through it and fashion-wise I love that era. I love the bigness of the fashions, the maxi's, the big hair, the big sleeves, the big pant legs, just big fashions everywhere! The big bold prints and just the pure freedom of it all. Some of my fondest memories are of the dancers on The Soul Train dance show that I used to watch every Saturday afternoon! 



I'm going to be celebrating the 70's all month long over on my blog so make sure you stop by to see what I create 70's style with a modern twist. To get the show started, I decided that Missoni deserved some attention. The story of Missoni's now-legendary patterned knits of zigzags, waves, and stripes began in 1948 when founders Rosita and Ottavio (Tai) met. The first collection under the Missoni label in Milan was presented in 1958. Missoni reached the peak of its influence in the fashion world in the early 1970s. When you see these stripes it screams Missoni! 



These prints are on clearance so you better get yours now! Black & White  and the Orange stripe Missoni like print. [New arrival options HERE!] Keep your eye out on my blog for this orange print! 

I wanted to make a duster that my daughter could wear with jeans and a chunky heel. For this project I used the Margo Blouse by Blue Dot Patterns. This peasant blouse screams 70's. I added 12 inches in length to the blouse along with a bottom ruffle that touches the floor. I also opened the front under the yoke and added 3 inches to the sleeve length and about 6 more inches to the width. This duster has the look that I was going for and you could also pull off a Boho look with this same duster. The cool thing about this fabric is that you can use the salvage edge of this fabric as your hem, I was able to use the salvage for my sleeves and my ruffle at the bottom of the duster.


I used a zig-zag stitch to sew this knit fabric and my serger to finish it off.













Michelle @ That Black Chic
 photo 35845374-bce1-426b-9e7a-633f43c85d42_zps12c60185.jpg

Comments

  1. Lovely look - takes me back to my high school days.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I hope those were good memories?? I was a little munchkin in the 70's but I love the style.

      Delete
  2. Michelle! You ROCKED this look!!!!!! I LOVE IT!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Raqayyah! This is one I'm going to make for myself!

      Delete
  3. That is beautiful. I love the way you added on the length. Great job.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Cathy this was a fun easy-to-sew-project!

      Delete
  4. It looks like that fabric created a lot of dust while stitching. You make this duster look so glamorous!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hahaha, you saw that? It sure did, I'm still cleaning up little dust bunnies near my machine!

      Delete
  5. Great to see this fabric in action! Thanks for your inspiring makes!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Elizabeth, that's the beautiful thing about seeing things people make. Sometimes they use fabrics that I skip right over and never consider until I've seen it in action.

      Delete
  6. You are my she-roe. I love Love Love Love Love your work!

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Thanks for leaving a comment! All comments are reviewed before posting to help us eliminate spam. Your comment will be posted within 24 hours.

Popular Posts You Might Like

Made By A Fabricista: Summer Sewing is in Full Effect

Hi Guys! Today I’m coming to you with this easy, breeze caftan from Simplicity Patterns because summer sewing is in full effect! While looking through my pattern stash, I came across McCall’s 8413. This pattern is described as McCall’s Sewing Pattern Misses’ Caftan In Two Lengths.  This is an Easy to Sew caftan in two lengths has ruched front with drawstring that ties at the bottom, V-shaped neckline, dolman sleeves and narrow hem. View C caftan has contrast on the left side. OK, let’s get into it because I have a few things to share and say about this pattern. When I first saw this pattern, I purchased it because I loved the ruching in the front. I think that ruching can hide just about any “imperfection” you might think you have. Now, I must mention that this is one of the few caftan patterns I’ve ever purchased because I’m petite and feel like I get lost in all that fabric.  Well, I didn’t even realize this was a caftan pattern until I read the pattern description while writing this

Made By A Fabricista: Embracing the linen wrinkles!

Hello wonderful sewists! Today I have a project that I have been meaning to sew for a while, but you know how it goes. Too many ideas, throw in some analysis paralysis, so many, many gorgeous fabrics to wear, and then, bam! Eons have passed. I’m working on sewing the plans that have been in my head the longest, which brings us to this dashing summer frock.  This is the Style Arc Esther Woven Dress. The style is intended for lighter wovens and the design is ripe for color blocking with the included center front and back seams. You could make right and left sides match; go full checkerboard with opposing rear right and left front; or just use four prints and go wild! I’m sticking with the most basic of blocking and splitting the dress down the center.  Importantly, I got matching threads for each linen color for all the topstitching. Matchy matchy is the name of the game in my book. I added bonus bartacks to keep the side seam pockets forward facing.  Medium Sky Blue and Light Steel Blue

Made by a Fabricista: Sewing a Maxi Dress: More Time, More Space, More Reward

My latest posts often mention time and space restraints. Indeed, sewing is a rather time-consuming activity that requires generous amounts of floor space, counter space, tablespace, and any other surface available. Despite everything, I was so glad to finally embark on a journey to sew myself a maxi dress. I know most readers have a strong sewing background and appreciate the effort required in a project like this. Still, I had fun keeping a mental score of all the steps to get this done, and what they mean outside of a sewist’s bubble. It is easy to underestimate the time and material needed to get a maxi dress like this done! Whenever I see someone wearing one on the street, I think: “That’s so beautiful, I should make one!” So, when this fabulous rayon showed up in Fabric Mart, I knew the moment had come. I chose the Elodie Wrap Dress by Closet Core Patterns because of its flowy and voluminous look and the dolman sleeves that are so comfortable to wear. The fabric itself is wonder