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Made by a Fabricista: Knits with a Color Pop!

Yes, I am a pattern repeater...there, I said it!  I don't even feel badly about it as I feel like repeats are the way you perfect a pattern, play with different fabric weights and types and just have fun experimenting!  



I’ve made two of these jackets and are made from Fabric Mart beauties.  My first was a lacey, wavy, striped knit that I am just so pleased with!  I've worn it and received many compliments on it! That is a winner in my book! This lace behaved so beautifully as it didn't stretch out of shape, washed and dried like a champ and also was perfect for the little details of this jacket such as the more fitted sleeves and armhole areas.  



I HAD to make another and so I choose this fun and funky floral that is off white with shades of brown, coffee, and black.  Neutrals are my friend!  I love sewing with colors such as these but also knew my wardrobe needed some color too!  I decided to use contrasting fabric for the facings along the neckline and the sleeve cuffs.  This pretty and punchy red was the perfect compliment--not only color wise but also weight and fabric type.  It is slinkier than the floral and feels so nice on my skin! Isn't that always a bonus?  


This is a StyleArc pattern that I purchased from Etsy called the Lillian Knit Jacket.  This came as a PDF.  Ever wonder what PDF means?  It is Portable Document Format and that is exactly what a pattern is that comes as a download.  No more waiting for the mail service from half way around the world to deliver a pattern from Australia!

There are a few things you need to know if you've never used a PDF.  First, your printer MUST be set to the correct format or your pattern will end up the wrong size!  Always print out a test page and get your ruler out to measure.  It needs to be exact!  It's one thing to take a garment in, but letting out is another story, especially when the seam allowances are only 1/4" as in the case of Style Arc.  


This is too big. The test square should be 10 cm or 3 15/16".  I had to change the setting on my printer before printing again.  See the difference?  



After printing, check the legend for the layout of your pieces.  This gives you great information on how you need to piece the pattern pieces so to speak!  



And, here is a beginning of a layout.  You need a big space for this!  



So back to the pattern and fabric! What gives you a slim fit is the styling of the sleeves and how you fit the underarms. You have to pivot at the points on the fabric. You can see how I did that below.  

 Sew, pivoting at the point, then clip! 



Look at what a great result you get!  



This is an easy to put together and was easier the second time!  You can really see the pop of red at the center front and slightly at the cuffs.  



The length of this pattern is great--it covers all the body parts you want covered without feeling like you need to tug it down all the time. 



See how nice this fabric hangs in the back?  It doesn't cling at all!  



Here you can see the red contrast. The facing is stitched down. I also like to serge the edge of facings, which I know isn't necessary with a knit but it helps 'clean up' my edges and also gives the knit a little weight as some tend to roll a bit at the cut edge. 



I love my jacket!  I hope that if you've never tried a PDF, you'll give it a whirl.  I also hope that you'll consider using a fun and colorful contrast to an otherwise neutral color pallet.  



 Thanks for reading!  



 Sue from Ilove2sew

Comments

  1. Love that pop of red. Just enough.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Your jackets are lovely. I must admit that so far, even looking at the printouts of PDF patterns exhausts me. :-) But your jackets might persuade me to jump in. And I agree about adding a bit of weight to knit facings. I'm going to go look at the pattern; wish me luck!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I hope you'll try a pdf as they aren't nearly as bad as you'd think!

      Delete
  3. I love the way the two fabrics you used with the same pattern produced such different, but both great looking, jackets.

    ReplyDelete

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