Skip to main content

Made by a Fabricista: A Study in Contrasts & Getting Ready for Spring!

For my March post, I knew I wanted to make some spring dresses.  I also know that I tend to sew brightly colored garments and I need some neutral garments in my closet, so I decided to make not one, but two dresses and to make them different in style, texture, and color!


The Ivory, off-white is a super yummy Rayon-Linen blend that was perfect for this dress. This particular fabric is sold out, but you can find others HERE.



This dress is made from an ITY knit. The fabric is sold out, but you can find many other options HERE

My goal was to make two entirely different garments--I think I achieved that, what do you think? 



For the off-white dress, I used McCall's 6885 which is an easy fit dress that is made from a woven fabric.  Fitting through the bust and shoulders is essential as the rest of the garment is rather rectangular shaped, perfect for what I envisioned.




Here you can see the details of the placket and front pockets: 



I really wanted the placket and collar to look polished so I auditioned several weights of interfacing until I found the one that works best. I picked Pro-Woven Fusible Light Crisp Interfacing from Fashion Sewing SupplyHeavier interfacings will give a more structured look and lightweight interfacing will give some stability but more casual feel. The buttons were shell buttons from my stash and I think they are the perfect size so they don't overpower the placket opening.

Now, let's move on to the more colorful of the two:



For the very colorful dress, I used this super cute and luscious knit in some of my most favorite colors! (sold out now, but other ITY knits can be found HERE.) The pattern is Simplicity 1018.  This one also needs to fit through the bust but is much more fitted all over and flares out at the hem to give it some twirl-ability.




I treat my knits well when sewing by testing the stitches on the serger and whether my coverstitch or a single needle stretch stitch will work best for the hems.  If you get wavy seams when using your serger, pull out your manual and read about how to adjust the various knobs so that your seams lie nice and flat, just like mine do!  I am also pretty proud of the print matching at the princess seams, especially on the garment front.  Can you see my seams?



I also found a nice way to eliminate the little bulge you can get at an intersecting seam where the binding and neckline meet.  At the fold line on the binding, clip the seam through the outer part of the seam but not through the innermost seam.  Next fold one part of the seam to one side and the remaining seam the opposite way.    



With this knit, I used a bright pink thread to top-stitch the seam down and at the hems.  For soft and luscious knits such as this, I prefer using a lighter weight thread and a stretch stitch for the hems.

I am so looking forward to spring!  We've had some unseasonably warm weather here in the Northern Plains, so I've been able to wear both of these uber comfortable dresses!  I love spring!


Thanks for reading!
Sue from Ilove2sew!

Comments

  1. Especially like the detail work on the white tunic. Very professional!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Penny! I appreciate your kind words!

      Delete
  2. Great job on these, Sue! Especially that placket! I have the same pink fabric- looks perfect for Spring.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Ann, I am very proud of that placket! Enjoy the pink fabric, it sews like a dream!

      Delete
  3. These both look like they will be high in your wardrobe rotation, so pretty!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Elizabeth! I have enjoyed wearing these pieces!

      Delete

Post a Comment

Thanks for leaving a comment! All comments are reviewed before posting to help us eliminate spam. Your comment will be posted within 24 hours.

Popular Posts You Might Like

DIY Tutorial: Infinity Scarves

Have a person on your gift list, but have no idea what to get for them? Making a gift is the perfect idea and it will be even more thoughtful than a silly little gift they don't really want anyway.
Infinity scarves are super easy and quick to make. They are called infinity scarves because they look like a continuous piece of fabric in a tubular form. You can make them in almost any type of knit. Knits come in so many different prints that you can make one for every outfit in your closet. 
Here is what you will need:  - Sewing machine - 1/2 yard of knit fabric (sweater knit, rayon knit, ITY knit, cotton knit, etc) Should also be 58/60" wide.  - Thread to match - Hand sewing needle
1) Fold the 1/2 yard piece of knit in half the long way. Pin along the entire long edge. 

2) Using a thin zig-zag stitch (almost straight stitch), stitch the long edge. I pull slightly on the front and back of the fabric as it goes through the sewing machine so that when the scarf is finished, it can b…

Made by a Fabricista: Classic Ponte Knit Pieces!

Happy Saturday All!
I am so over this heat here in South Florida!  The humidity and the high temperature feels like 100+ degrees each day.  I can't wait for Fall so that I can truly enjoy the cooler temperatures.
Whenever Fabric Mart has designer ponte knit fabric in stock and on sale, I grab as many yards as I am allowed to.  I absolutely love sewing with ponte knit versus other knits as the stability and structure are perfect for my personal taste (See my previous Fabric Mart post using ponte knit here and here).