Skip to main content

Made by a Fabricista: Suit Up!


As soon as simplicity released their Fall patterns I knew I wanted to make S8749 by Mimi G. This fall I've decided to make more separates. I'm always in need of tops and pants because I default to dresses. Additionally, I have also wanted to tackle a blazer for a while now and this oversized blazer seemed like a good place to start.




Simplicity recommends gaberdine, stretch woven, ponte or wool types and I selected this red wool gabardine with a small lycra content. When this fabric arrived I couldn't stop caressing it, it has such a nice hand, a wool like feel, the perfect amount of stretch and this shade of red is everything. Unfortunately this fabric is sold out but this light tan gabardine is similar. If you prefer non-stretch I also like the color of this olive khaki worsted wool.


The pants were sewn first because I was worried they would require some adjustments and likely be more time consuming. I fell in between a 18 and 20W so I did something I hardly ever do...made a quick muslin. Are ya'll proud of me? I am! And I have to admit I was so glad I did because the 20 was just too loose. With that knowledge I revisited the size 18 and graded up from just below the hip to the waist about 1/2" and cut the size 20 waistband. Overall I am pleased with the fit of these pants for a first attempt. They could be tapered more below the need and I'm guessing that the front crotch could shortened to eliminate some of those pulls across the front.



I also tried to dress up my insides by bias binding the pocket bags, waistband and leg hem. Though it does look clean on the inside I don't love that you an see the outline when worn due to the fitted style of these slacks. I'll keep that in mind for my next pair of slacks. The side slit at the ankle is a nice touch!


On to the blazer...I'm so glad Mimi G designed this boyfriend blazer! For one it is very on-trend and two it's a tad more forgiving in terms of fit. I love the longer length and think it will layer nicely over jeggings and dresses as well as the enclosed pants. 


The welt pockets were a first for me and I have to say, while they are not perfect, I am proud of them. If you follow my IG stories you saw that I made one attempt on scraps and then jumped right in on my jacket front  (if you don't follow me now as it's still in my highlights). Another first for me was adding shoulder heads utilizing some scrap fleece I had laying around.


Other than tackling those firsts, nothing was tricky about the blazer. The sleeves are a tad tight around the bicep, but that is becoming an issue with most patterns for me. I also choose to line it with a stretch satin instead of a traditional lining so it is a tad heavier that most blazers. I did complain a time or two that there were too many pieces while cutting out the fabric, lining and interfacing, but it was definitely worth it. I can't tell you how I'm proud I am of this suit! I truly wish I had a holiday event to attend so that I could pair this suit with a velvet top or bodysuit.


Time really flies! Can you believe the holiday season is already here! I hope you had a fun, filling Thanksgiving with family and friends!

See you next month!

Tiffany
TipStitched

Comments

  1. Great Look. You did a fabulous job.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Nice job i have the same pattern felt that i wasn't ready to make it just yet

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I say give it a try with some fabric you wouldn't mind wasting. Mimi has the videos which really help with each step. The pants are actually straight forward if you've made pants before, the issue with pants is always fit. The blazer has more steps and pieces but not inherently difficult.

      Delete
  3. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  4. That is a wonderful outfit and looks great on you. I hope you wear it lots, even when there are no events to go to!

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Thanks for leaving a comment! All comments are reviewed before posting to help us eliminate spam. Your comment will be posted within 24 hours.

Popular Posts You Might Like

Made by a Fabricista: Spring is for Shirtdress

I love shirt dresses! My pattern collection reflects this (I may or may not have eight shirt dress patterns) but somehow my closet does not. I have just two DIY shirt dresses (Mimi G's Katie dress and Simplicity 8546) and maybe two RTW versions. So it's high time that I added some to my wardrobe.


This polyester blouse weight twill by Milly has the perfect weight and drape for a relaxed shirt dress. If you prefer a more structured look, stick to a cotton shirting or light weight sateen. I loved this fabric and print so much that I grabbed both colorways. Unfortunately this fabric is sold out, but you can browse other shirtings and blouse weight fabrics here.


This fabric has a somewhat slinky feel, but isn't truly slippery. There's also a slight sheen without being shiny like a satin. It was easy to cut and sew, but I did get a few snags when pinning so make sure you use sharp pins and a fresh machine needle. I serged my pieces before assembling the pattern because as m…

Fabricista Guest Post: "Julie's Picks" Goes to the Opera

Hello, fellow fabric enthusiasts and sewers alike ! My name is Mary Martha and I am thrilled to be presenting a guest post for Fabric Mart's Fabricista blog. As a bit of background, I fell madly in love with opera in 2015 when I attended my first performance in a movie theater as part of the Metropolitan Opera's "Live in HD" simulcasts, which projects live staged operas in New York City into cinemas worldwide via satellite. (They're fantastic !) Since the start, I have dressed the part of the characters when attending these performances, beginning with outfits fashioned from scarves and skirts in my mother's closet to more ornate costumes. It was during this time that I taught myself to sew using a sewing machine and I haven't looked back ─ my life was changed forever !
In December 2018, I subscribed to Julie's Picks swatch club as an educational experience: I wanted to expand my knowledge of different fabrics besides the typical polyester satins I h…