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Made by a Fabricista: The Ivory Eyelet Bias Skirt!


McCall's 4970: the ivory eyelet skirt


Hi everybody! Some fabrics just say summer, and cotton eyelet is definitely one of them in my opinion. For this month's post I played with a gorgeous ivory eyelet and made a bias skirt using McCall's 4970, a pattern with 3 lovely skirt options.







The fabric

I had originally selected this cotton eyelet a while ago with nothing specific in mind. I could have chosen one pattern or another as this fabric is just right for so many things: tops, dresses, blouses, skirts, even shorts. The base is a very fine quality ivory cotton lawn, and the embroidered pattern goes vertically. It sewed and pressed beautifully!

This fabric is so pretty that it sold out in no time, but a similar option could be this cotton eyelet. Don't forget to visit the embroidered eyelet fabric page where you'll find other lovely fabrics!


McCall's 4970: I made view B

The pattern

McCall's M4970 has probably been aging in my stash since the pattern came out in 2005! Oddly, I could only find one version of it on the internet. I hope my version can serve as another reference if anyone should want to make this skirt.

For a moment I envisioned to make a tiered skirt, an obvious choice with eyelet, but wanting a little more visual interest in the end I selected McCall's 4970 view B and cut a size 10, my usual with the Big Four. The design change I made was to cut the center of the front and back pieces to add a center seam, and place the vertical lines of the embroidery on the bias to form chevrons. I also debated whether to place the zipper on the side as per the pattern, but finally decided to put it in the back.

I was worried that the invisible zipper would cause bumps and wavy seams as it is sewn to a fabric piece on the bias. Inserting zippers on the bias is never something I look forward to, even more so when there's a pattern to match! But since the embroidery adds substance to the cotton lawn it came out surprisingly well, and I was able to match the chevrons without any fuss I must say. I almost patted myself on my back when I saw the result!


McCall's 4970 back view - the invisible zipper is inserted in the CB seam

Close-up showing texture of fabric + invisible zipper

I finished the top and bottom of the ruffle with a narrow 3 thread rolled hem on the serger, using ivory Mettler silk finish cotton thread to match the eyelet fabric.

I could have lined the skirt, but decided to leave it unlined and to wear a skin tone slip underneath instead. 

That skirt is breezy and summery and it lift my spirits to have a new summer garment in my wardrobe! I've always loved eyelet but I don't recall working with that fabric a lot in the past. I'm quite happy I experimented with eyelet for this month's make - thank you so much Fabric Mart for providing us with a steady flow of inspiring fabrics!



I'll leave it here for now - I hope you are enjoying the weather and are finding time for sewing summer garments!

What's inspiring you these days?

Virginie
from


Comments

  1. The skirt is lovely and I really like how you chevroned the stripes to get the embroidered fabric some additional interest.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Such a beautiful skirt and yes - cotton eyelet screams summer!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Love your new skirt! The way the wind plays with the ruffles is very pretty!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Lovely skirt Virginie! It is so fresh and absolutely screams summer!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Eyelet is so lovely for summer. Excellent work with the chevrons--it's so subtle but beautiful workmanship!

    ReplyDelete

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