Skip to main content

Made by a Fabricista: Spring layers

With the world as crazy as it is right now, my original plans to make a very girly dress and solid colored dark slip for underneath changed as soon as I started to cut out my fabric.  I know we shouldn't let current events such as Covid19 ruin our plans, but all the sudden a girly dress and slip seemed impractical.  I detoured and decided I needed another long cardigan and a lovely blouse/top to wear underneath because when you think you'll be working from home, you need comfortable separates, right?


Especially if you have to do some sort of video conference call.  Your top half can look all polished but the bottom half?  Jeans, pjs, etc.  :)  



I just love sewing chiffon!  I love this top too!


I chose this absolutely gorgeous chiffon for my top.  It  is sold out, but here is a pretty 
alternative: abstract animal print chiffon. Or check out the whole chiffon category here.



Chiffon use to be one of my fear fabrics, did I tell you that?  But I decided not so long ago that the only reason I feared it was that I hadn't mastered some techniques to sew it properly.  Once I did that, there was no more reason to fear and pass up sewing some beautiful fabric!  

The Bondi Top
Bondi top pattern from Sew to Grow.

First, start with a simple pattern.  This pattern only has a few steps yet I took the time to fit it to me a while back so for me, it is a TNT.   This is the Bondi top by Sew to Grow.  Careful pressing as you sew is an absolute must as well.  I even use liquid spray starch on my seams and all rounded areas (think bias) such as at the neckline prior to stitching together.  Just be sure and test the starch out on a scrap to make sure it doesn't discolor your fabric. 

Neckline finish with self-fabric bias tape and spray starch! 

For my hemlines on this top, I used self-fabric bias tape that I cut with a ruler and rotary cutter.  Do you know how old your rotary cutter blade is?  If you are unsure, either get a new blade or sharpen it before cutting out your chiffon, it will make a huge difference, trust me!  Don't forget to edge stitch too!

Hemline finish with bias binding

I barely modified the pattern (other than the bias bands at the sleeve and shirttail hems).  I decided to line the back yoke with the main fabric to give it a bit more structure and help give a cleaner finish on the inside. And, since I am using chiffon, I made french seams at the sides.  



For this cardigan, I used this amazingly soft and easy to work with knit.  Here's a link to the fabric which is available as I write this post: navy-polyester-lycra-ity-knit This stuff sews so well plus it washes, dries, and takes an iron like a champ!  There was limited yardage at the time I am writing this post, so make sure to check out their ITY category if it's sold out!


I can't believe how many navy garments I've made lately so for me, this will coordinate with so many things already in my closet.  


Just because this cardigan has some curved edges at the back neckline and along the front of the garment where the front band is attached, I used SewkeysE stay tape in black along the front and back neckline to help stabilize it.  That may have been overkill, but since this is a garment I will frequently wear, I wanted to make sure that nothing stretched out as I sewed.  Remember that starch I mentioned above?  I used that on every seam as well.  

 My only 'derp' moments for sewing these two garments together was when I put the cardigan pockets on too low not once, but twice!  I had to carefully unpick since I knew I wanted this cardigan long.  

If you are interested, here is the pattern I used.  

Harper classic knit cardigan and duster (PDF) – Sinclair patterns

If you've always wanted to sew a cardigan but have been afraid to, this pattern is free.  Take a look but before you head over there, make sure you pick out some lovely knit to make it first.  FM has many beautiful choices!  


Thanks for reading and stay healthy everyone!
Sue from Ilove2sew!

Comments

  1. Love your new pieces. Hope you and your family have a lovely Easter.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Wow this color on the duster--beautiful, and your finishing work on the chiffon is fab. I had to laugh when I saw the video conference call comment--I'm totally there!

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Thanks for leaving a comment! All comments are reviewed before posting to help us eliminate spam. Your comment will be posted within 24 hours.

Popular Posts You Might Like

Made by a Fabricista: Cafe au Lait Linen Dress

Hello everyone. This linen dress is the first thing that I made after my husband passed away 2 months ago.  At first, it was a real struggle- I kept putting things together the wrong way and having to rip it out and do it over again.  I probably shouldn't have chosen an asymmetrical design with fabric that looks the same on both sides for my first project!  But as I finished, I felt a real sense of accomplishment!  I have to say that creating something unique and special was just what I needed to feel a little like myself again.   I used three coordinating pieces of linen- a deep coffee colored brown, a milky cream, and an abstract print with whipped cream, cloves, and cinnamon it- thus, my cafe au lait dress!  These particular fabrics are no longer available, but there are lots of other choices in the Linen section.  Linen is so wonderful to work with.  You do need to accept that wrinkles will be part of the look though, which I am fine with.  For the pattern, I used Vogue 1694 wh…

Made by a Fabricista: Down to Business

Hello everyone!  The last time I posted about some things I sewed for my daughter, Serena, she was in Chicago in 2017, and I had made her a black and white mini-wardrobe here.  Fast forward 3 years, and she is climbing the corporate ladder and just got promoted to a position where she would need to present frequently to a board of directors.  So, the challenge was making something appropriate to wear to the board meetings, also something that would pack in a suitcase well, and something that would be not so dressy so she would still be able to wear it to work on a non-board meeting day.  Her workplace is generally ultra casual, which is the trend in most businesses, as I hear.  I wish it were more dressy, as I love making suit jackets!
So, to me, the fabrics that came to mind were ponte and double knits- non-wrinkle, comfortable, washable, and professional looking.  At the time (this was back in June), Fabric Mart had this fantastic black and white pinstripe knit available.  It is so n…