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Sewing in the Family.

Without a doubt my daughter is the center of attention in all that I do. Since the moment I knew I was pregnant I planned my day, my week, month and year around her. I try to care for her providing food, well-being, health, spiritual growth through our church and family, means to access education and moral teaching, ethics and manners (improving mine on the way).

The influence of my family in my daughter’s life is a great advantage in her development. My mother’s suggestions were at first a cause of headache and upset. But I learned that providing for my daughter all of the above aspects are wonderful but that was not enough to assure a good future. Giving her the gift of the arts is a shortcut to build in her strength, good feelings, culture, spiritual growth and much more.

In professional terms art:
  • Stimulates and develops the imagination and critical thinking, and refines cognitive and creative skills.
  • Has a tremendous impact on the developmental growth of children and has proven to help level the "learning field" across socio-economic boundaries.
  • Strengthens problem-solving and critical-thinking skills, adding to overall academic achievement and school success.
  • Develops a sense of craftsmanship, quality task performance, and goal-setting—skills needed to succeed in the classroom and beyond.
  • Teaches children life skills such as developing an informed perception; articulating a vision; learning to solve problems and make decisions; building self-confidence and self-discipline; developing the ability to imagine what might be; and accepting responsibility to complete tasks from start to finish.
  • Nurtures important values, including team-building skills; respecting alternative viewpoints; and appreciating and being aware of different cultures and traditions.
Source: Young Children and the Arts: Making Creative Connections, 1998

I was introduced to art as a way of playing in school and at home, so I found it quite easy to do the same with my child. Keeping her in the game I think is the challenge. I was told to analyze my child, and not to make decisions for her.

My mother also asked me to take my daughter to festivals, museums, art stores, and libraries. She says these are ways to let a child know what they like. I bought her a lot of supplies and tried different activities with her that I did not even enjoy and others in which I am successful but were challenging for her. I had to let her try several options, patiently supporting her own decisions and helping her organize her time, setting a schedule that in the end helped her become successful in her goals.
 
The most important tip I learned from my mother is, never strongly suggest, nor give a step-by-step formula to obtain results. Just show her my way of doing them, teach her the way to use the tools and elements and let her produce. There is not a perfect or imperfect product. That is just ART.

My mother welcomed us (all her daughters) in whatever she was working on, no matter the mess. Thank you, Mom, for your patience.

Here is something my daughter made while I was sewing this weekend. I told her I wanted to sew a couple of tops  in the same design for her and I. I took pictures to register the progress of my project in a journal.
 
 Here piece of my project
This is going to be a Key Ring Neck Top

 I did not ask her to sew or do anything at all; I took my sewing machine, fabric and tools out. I cleaned my area and started drawing on a piece of paper and then on the fabric. She began asking for materials to make a purse. She knows more about what scraps and fabrics I have than even I do! She drew a sketch on paper, selected the fabric she wanted to use and there she was making a mess in the living room with me.
 Here is my daughters project sketch and fabric.
 A picture for her journal book
Sewing her Project
 Helping me with the top


What are your experiences of creating with siblings, children or friends around you?
~ Gabby ~

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