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Made by a Fabricista: Tutorial on Collar for "A Right to Bare Arms"

If you read my review on "A Right to Bare Arms", a sleeveless top by Dana Marie Designs, you will see that I talk a lot about the collar. The pattern comes with directions on how to make the collar with a bias collar and a non-bias collar. 

On my first attempt at this top, shown below,  I made the collar from a black ponte knit. I chose the ponte knit because I didn't want to mix a knit with woven. I also didn't have any solid wovens in my stash, so I opted for the black ponte thinking it would have enough stability. Putting a knit on bias is not a smart choice. (I should have known better!) Here are some close-ups of my issue...


I really should have used the non-bias method if I wanted to use the ponte knit. 



I decided to make another top, but this time using a woven for the collar and cut it out from the non-bias method. Here were the results: 


Much better don't you think? I also top-stitched the collar to give it more strength. As I mentioned in the previous blog post, I used a loose-weave linen for this collar with interfacing. 


For the sake of my reader's, I wanted to try the bias-cut again. I selected a cotton shirting to test. The pattern calls for you to cut out a 4"x 22" bias strip. 


Using the paper patter as your guide, pin one end to the pattern piece. 


Gradually stretch it following the pattern and steam iron at the same time. Pin as you go. 


Let the collar cool, then finish the pattern as read. 


I still did not have success with the bias-cut method. I laid it over one of my finished tops to mimick the curve it needs to take and it still did not lay flat.


I'm the kind of person that likes to have things work the first time and unfortunately, I have to say I will not be trying the bias-method again. It may have to do with the fabric I selected (again.) Maybe I need a softer fabric like a voile or challis. But to make my life (and hopefully yours) a little easier, I will be doing the non-bias method in the future.

Other than the collar, I really like this top. It is super easy to make and can be done in an afternoon. The fact that it can be made in different lengths is even better!

Happy Sewing!
Julie

Comments

  1. I don't know if it was the collar alone that was the problem. I purchased from you all and used the paisley fabric which you used for the body of the shirt. That fabric gave me fits, every time I wore the dress it "grew". It never hung correctly.I know the ponte knit was not ideal, but I do not know if you could ever succeed with that fabric.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanks for sharing. I learned a lot with this post.

    ReplyDelete

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