Skip to main content

Made by a Fabricista: A New Wool Coat!

Every winter I make at least one coat for myself and this year was no exception. Living in South Dakota where winter can and has truly lasted until May, you wear your coat a lot and it is so nice to have some choices in your closet.

I found this beautiful designer wool at Fabric Mart and hoped I could use it for January's blog. I was even more thrilled when it arrived as the photo simply doesn't do it justice. It is soft, heavy, and very warm, perfect for a northern plain's winter!

I wanted a coat unlike one I currently have in my closet and one that was a little dressier than my others. For the pattern, I choose the Stella Coat by StyleArc.  Can you blame me? Look at those design lines!  They are beautiful!

                        Transeasonal Coat - one pattern for two seasons

This is a pattern for experienced sewers only and why it isn't terribly difficult, it does require some tailoring techniques to make it look good, otherwise with the cross-over effect and the belt, it could easily become a bathrobe.  ;(  Not good!



Sewing with wool is absolutely a pleasure. I prepared my wool by throwing it in the dryer with a wet towel, not just once but twice before cutting out. It worked beautifully.



I love the stand collar, it is interfaced on both sides to give it that structure. With the 1/4" seam allowances at the edges, hardly any trimming of the seams was necessary.



I am very proud of how the sleeves/shoulders lay. I typically make a 1/4" adjustment at the shoulders for my sloping in that area. I decided not to and knew I'd add shoulder pads. This time I used 1/2" and also made my own sleeve heads. Anyone remember inserting those? I cut one inch strips of batting and sewed that to the sleeve head with a simple whipstitch.  

Other reviewers that have made this coat have left off the center back seam, but I choose not too because of the shaping in that area the seam allows. I don't think it detracts from the overall look of the coat.



Can you tell how much I love the pockets on this coat?  The placement is perfect and they are nice and roomy. So they wouldn't float around, I attached a piece of seam binding from the 'corner' of the pocket and attached it to the front seam allowance.  



I can't believe how cold it was when we were taking these pictures!  The coat is fully lined and has completely separate pattern pieces for the lining which give an amazing structure.  




When I sew with wool, I first sew the seam with a straight stitch and then press the seam to embed the stitches. After that, I open the seam and iron it so I get a nice open seam.  



To press the seams open, I like using these wooden tailor boards. This one has a nice point on it that I used in the collar areas to get a nice, crisp point.  


After pressing the seams open, I finished the edges with my serger.  Wool ravels rather easily and I want this coat to last for years!



After serging, I fold wrong sides together and press again.  Look at that beautiful edge!  


For the back yoke, I cut that piece on the crossgrain, just to give it a bit of a difference.  It isn't anything that jumps out at you but is subtle.  

The inside of my coat is just as beautiful as the outside, I am so proud of it!  


I love my coat.  If you've never sewn with wool before, give yourself a treat and sew up a new coat! It is gratifying, will last forever, and is a true statement piece you'll enjoy reaching for again and again!  

Thanks for reading!
Sue from Ilove2sew!

Comments

  1. Gorgeous coat! The sleeves are set in beautifully!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Becca! I appreciate your kind words!

      Delete
  2. Lovely coat! Thanks for all the tips. Karen

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you sewing km! This is a great pattern.

      Delete
  3. Great pattern and fit for you. It is beautiful.

    ReplyDelete
  4. This is stunning, Sue. I really like how warm you look, which I know is good in your area! :) Did you interface any of the bits with anything special (like a hair canvas) or did you choose to use other types of more readily available interfacings (like a pellon fusible interfacing)? I ask since the structure of the coat looks nice and sturdy and since that is a desire of mine for future coats, I would love to know what you did.

    BTW, like I have said in the past, we like the SAME fabric every single time. Of course I had to grab some of that gorgeous boucle the last time it went on sale!!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Dina, I used an interfacing from Fashion Sewing Supply which was like a hair canvas only fusible. Does that make sense? In some places I interfaced both pieces, such as both sides of the stand collar and the front facing and front portion of the jacket. I even interfaced the tie waistband!
      Haha--we must have the same great taste when it comes to fabric!

      Delete
  5. Replies
    1. Thank you Nakisha! I love this coat so very much!

      Delete
  6. Great work! This is a beautiful coat.

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Thanks for leaving a comment! All comments are reviewed before posting to help us eliminate spam. Your comment will be posted within 24 hours.

Popular Posts You Might Like

Made by a Fabricista: Coming Up Roses

 From vision to reality. As we are headed into April, I can feel the spring breeze on the horizon and with that means fun time outside, be it eating brunch with friends on a terrace or going to the park on a beautiful Sunday afternoon.  I knew that I wanted to add some bright fun color into my spring wardrobe that I really haven't used and over a year.  I had been eyeing this beautiful red stripe shirting with blue roses fabric for a while not knowing exactly what I wanted to do with it but knew that I was super drawn to it.   Once I picked it up, I decided to sketch out my ideas and went through my pattern stash to see what I could come up with. For this project I used a vintage pattern See & Sew 5549.  It’s actually for a long sleep shirt that I then made some alterations to.  I lengthened the sleeves by an inch and extended the side slits up to the waistline because I knew that I would mostly be wearing this shirt open.  Also since I planned to wear it mostly open I only did

Made by a Fabricista: Use Those Views! Sewing the Grainline Studio Willow Tank

Spring is here! Honestly, I'm still bundled up in sweatshirts most of the time, but the afternoons are getting glorious and warm and just a t-shirt will suffice for a couple of hours in the warmth on some days so I know the overwhelming heat is not far off. I love planning and organizing in all facets of my life, and spring garments for my wardrobe are on my mind. Naturally tanks are at the forefront of my strategizing for comfort in hot weather and I wanted to branch out with a little something new.  Anyone else have patterns that they've been eyeing for ages but haven't pulled the trigger? Who knows why I've kept putting off sewing the Grainline Studio Willow Tank . I've long admired the simple lines and I'm absolutely sure it would fit into my overall style. I've even tried drafting something similar myself with varying degrees of success, but never quite on the nose. A simple tank can go with just about everything from jeans to skirts to a high-waisted a

Made by a Fabricista: Spring Style Essentials

Is there anything more versatile for your Spring wardrobe than a T-Shirt Dress and a classic button-up blouse? In this Fabric Mart Fabricista blog, I'm going to show you how these two little wardrobe staples can be rotated through your spring me-made wardrobe for 5 different and fun looks!  I was browsing the Fabric Mart website when this lovely 100% Cotton Parchment/Black Striped Jersey Knit Fabric popped up. I’ve been itching to make a T-Shirt dress with the Rebecca Page T-Shirt Dress pattern ever since the pattern launched back in February. As I continued to browse the Fabric Mart website, I was struck by the most lovely Blossom Pink Silk Shantung Shirting that I knew would be perfect for a Grainline Studios Archer Button-Up ! As the wheels started turning, I realized that the cotton jersey paired with the silk shantung shirting fabric would be a match made in heaven for my me-made wardrobe. So naturally, I had to get both fabrics plus the Archer Button-Up pattern! I was not d