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Made by a Fabricista: Tobago Shorts


This time of the year, I do nothing but blog about my upcoming vacation.  Each year in June, I travel to one of my absolute favorite places in the world, Puerto Rico.  Growing up in NY, Puerto Rico and its people have always been a part of my life and is literally weaved throughout my family.   The island and its culture are something that speak to me and I don't think there will ever be a time in which I stop going.

When I think of the Caribbean, I think of bright and vibrant colors.  I remember visiting the Virgin Islands many years ago for my first of many carnivals and being overwhelmed with the colors of the sea, the mountain sides, the homes, and the many colors displayed on the costumes they wore. 

The fabric I used for these shorts (yes they are shorts) is a Caribbean Blue 100% open weave suiting that until recently was available on sale @ $3.00 per yard.  This garment is also suitable for Linen which is currently on sale (HERE).  As soon as I finished this garment, I ordered red and yellow linen from FM (HERE) & (HERE).  I also have plans to make these in denim.  If you do so, be sure to use a denim that is no more than 7oz.  Anything heavier will create a large amount of bulk.

The concept of these shorts is for each piece (2) front and (2) back to be created as a half circle.  I do so using the measurements from the top of the shorts sloper with the darts (10 & 10.5) inches and create the waist area similar to how circle skirts are made.  Once this is complete, you can cut the center front and side seams using a pattern or a sloper.  This is what the finished piece will look like.



Pockets and waistbands stay the same as if you were constructing a normal pair of shorts.  I extended my sloper 2 inches all the way around to make sure I had clearance once the shorts were hemmed due to this shape. 

Now on to the tricky part.  Once your pieces are cut, you have to manipulate the waist your pieces down to the normal size of your pattern/sloper.  To do this, you must insert (3) darts.  The size of these darts will vary but the locations MUST be the same.  In the case of this garment, my first dart is positioned exactly at the midpoint of both pieces and the other two equally separated from there.  Remember to do this AFTER you put your pocket on if using a sloper or pattern with a visible side pocket for your front pieces.  The remainder of construction is standard from there. 








I am in absolute love with these shorts and cannot wait to wear them next week!  Once I get my linen from Fabric Mart, I will be making a tutorial for anyone that needs visual assistance. 

Shoes: Steve Madden
Accessories (including glasses): Target


Happy Sewing!

Muah
- Jenese

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