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Made By A Fabricista: Speaking My Truth

Happy Saturday All! In these unsettling times, I hug my children a little tighter, spend quality time embracing them, and cherish every moment even more. This pandemic has allowed me to appreciate deep conversations about racial injustice, police brutality, and their feelings about growing up black.
My daughter Arielle, a happy go lucky child, shuns away as she is always being questioned about her race and which box she checks off on an application. She hates the fact that she is consistently asked by her peers and teachers at school if she is biracial, Hispanic, or Black. She has often times questioned her own identity, yet she gladly responds to anyone who asks, “ I am black and I am a part of the human race”.

My son despises the news media (especially social media) and doesn't watch it at all. The death of his older brother and guns triggers a fear that we pray he overcomes. Over the past few weeks, I have read some of the most unreal remarks and comments about "all lives matter" on social media, seen things I didn't want to see and heard words in videos that pierced my heart. We know that "all lives matter" but if BLACK LIVES MATTERED there would be no need for us protesting and shouting it from the mountain top. I have pondered and struggled over the past week and even yesterday whether to share my truth on this platform or just do my regular sewing post but felt compelled to speak up and use my voice to share that BLACK LIVES MATTER. I am not OK and have had my crying moments when I think about how BLACKS continue to face oppression and racism that our forefathers paid the price for 400 years ago. I have had to navigate my way through my daily struggles of being black yet show up each day and pretend to the students I teach that everything is OK. I personally believe we can break this cycle by teaching our kids the minute they are born about equality and racism. This starts in the home and we ought to have open conversations around the breakfast, lunch, and dinner table, at family gatherings even when it makes us uncomfortable. As an educator, every moment is a teachable moment, but I cannot teach a child to love another person if it doesn't start at home.

My personal journey with systemic racism and my own struggles with equity and equality run deep as I have fought and voiced my opinion about textbooks and educational resources that are not available in black schools that are culturally sensitive and diverse. I have worked in various capacities in education including curriculum and publishing and have seen and heard the insensitive comments made about black students and inner-city schools. I teach in predominantly black schools where we lack so much, yet teachers still have to show up, maintain our professionalism, and give our students our best self each day with a smile.

As an educator, I may have the luxury to send my child to any school in the district including the suburbs where taxpayers in the community provide a lot of financial support to the school; but how many blacks parents have these options? I will use my platform and voice in Education and will continue to mentor and educate young minds and support and guide more first-generation students in pursuing a Higher Education. I will continue the fight for access and advocate for equality, equity, and justice by writing letters, grants, attending and participating in workshops so that I can be a beacon of light. I will also challenge you, my readers, the sewing community to start reflecting on how you can make a change not just in the BLACK community today during these times but next month, next year and years to come.

Thanks to Fabric Mart for allowing me to share my story! From my heart to yours if you made it this far, thank you so much for reading! I will share more details about my makes in a special blog post or even next month so be on the lookout. This beautiful challis dress made with the bodice of Vogue 9253 lifted my spirits. The fabric is still available so go grab a few yards here. In addition, I am sharing the spotlight and highlighting a few sewists that I admire. 
No matter what I may be going through, their post and vibes always put a smile on my face. Each person is unique in their own way and I would love for you to check them out.
Keira - Islandsewcialist - https://islandsewcialist.com
Daphney - bydaphney - https://daphneyboutin.com
Abigail - abigayil.em - https://abigayilem.com
Adria - adriashanelle

Be sure to subscribe and check out my NEW WEBSITE and BLOG at https://www.maricamitchell.com.
One Love,


Comments

  1. Thank you for sharing, Marica. I hear you, and I see you, and I am so glad you are here enriching all of us with both your wonderful sewing skills and your perspective.

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  2. So beautifully written. Thank you for sharing.

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  3. Today your post has truly touched my soul. What you said is true. All lives do matter but our lives are the ones being traumatized. I hope this post truly make others reflect and not decide to just push it aside because it is uncomfortable.
    The dress is absolutely gorgeous and I will go look for some of that gorgeous fabric.

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  4. Beautiful outfits and your statements are so true! In the midst of this pandemic, we have seen some of the best of humanity and unfortunately, some of the worst. Our racist problems have once again resurfaced in such an ugly fashion. We’ve also seen the beauty of the human spirit as we marched together to make right our long list of wrongs dealing with race. Love will always triumph over hate, so although this fight is far from over, we will definitely win.

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  5. I really love the dress & have seen some of your other masterpieces. Did you also make your daughter's dress, too. You did a beautiful job. Looking forward to seeing more of your work & like your son, my daughter & me are not on any Facebook or Twitter. My opinion they are not friends just acquaintances. Friends you go to lunch with 😎.

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  6. Thank you for sharing your story. As a white woman from the Deep South I learn something every time I read stories like yours.

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  7. Marcia, thank you for sharing your story! I only know you through on-line media platforms, yet I can hear the passion in your words. Your post is beautifully written! Again, thank you for sharing!

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    Replies
    1. Thanks for those kind words Sue. Greatly appreciated

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  8. That you for this. I feel deeply affected. #listeningandlearning

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  9. Thank you for your eloquent words, and for your influential role as a Fabric Mart Fabricista. I appreciate your time and openness, and especially your strength and courage, which is so evident in your daughter, and I am sure in your son as well. I don’t participate in social media, but I do keep up with news, as I believe education is so vital to fulfill the promise of democracy for all. We’re not there yet, but we still have time...

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    Replies
    1. Thank you so much for reading. I appreciate you taking the time out to read.

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  10. Thank you continuing my education. (Love the photo of you holding the camera.)

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  11. Thank you for your honesty and for your heart. I don't pretend I know your pain, but I want to stand by you and support you and others like you. Some of what I see happening in US and UK just makes my heart bleed, but your words are a comfort.

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  12. I am reading your post over a month later. I wish I could say I see a change in things—-I don’t. However, we didn't just get to this moment. It’s been centuries in the making and to correct and move forward is going to be an arduous marathon. I am hopeful, though. While I don’t see a change, I do feel a slight rumble. A rumble that has forced open conservations on race, justice, and oppression born of complicity, silence and privilege. Thank you for using your platform to help shake us up and move us forward.

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  13. It's been a few months since your last post and so much continues to unfold, thank you for your words and your inspiration , courage and exquisite fashionista taste!

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