Skip to main content

Made by a Fabricista: Fore!


Last year I decided to take up golf again after playing only a handful of times over the past two decades. When I think back to what we were wore for golf when I was playing in the 90s it was basically regular street clothes - 100% cotton pants and knit or woven tops with practically no stretch. Times have changed! Golf wear is now truly athletic wear and those constricting fabrics have been replaced by technical fabrics. But RTW golf clothes are expensive, in boring colors, and the sizing isn’t always inclusive. Time to make my own.

I spent some time going through my patterns and found that I had everything I needed to make a full outfit comprised of a top, jacket, skirt, and little shorts to be worn under the skirt. 

Fabrics

If you sew you know that it can be quite difficult to find technical fabric for athletic wear. A couple of months ago I discovered that Fabric Mart has an entire section of fabric suitable for athletic wear! My jacket and top patterns both have side panels/princess seams so I picked out two fabrics that would look good together.

French Wine Pink Polyester/Lycra Techno Knit is a beefy athletic wear fabric in gorgeous cherry pink. There is plenty of stretch and it’s suitable for a top, jacket, leggings or even a dress.

Powder White Nylon/Lycra Tricot Activewear Knit is lighter in weight than the Techno Knit. It drapes nicely and is almost opaque. This fabric feels like many of my summer RTW athletic tops. It would be excellent for tops and lightweight jackets, and depending on your style, for leggings or skirts.

When I received my Activewear fabrics from Fabric Mart, I discovered in my stash a piece of Stretch Bengaline (purchased from Fabric Mart/Julie’s Picks last summer) and it had that same cherry pink in the print. Best of all, the Bengaline has almost 50% stretch along the length of the fabric. There’s lots of bending in golf so stretch is good! I now had everything I needed for my golf wardrobe.

Patterns

I selected four patterns:

Top: Butterick 6494 - close-fitting top with raglan sleeves, front and back princess seams and a small stand collar. The pattern has long sleeves, so I cut them short to make the top suitable for summery weather.

Jacket: Kwik Sew 3452 - quarter-zip jacket with raglan sleeves, side panels and stand up collar.

Shorts: Kwik Sew 4044 - elastic waist capris cut to short length.

Skirt: Pamela’s Patterns Magic Pencil Skirt - elastic waist skirt modified to A-line with side slits and pockets. 


The top, jacket and shorts were all cut at the same time. The top and jacket are both easy-to-sew patterns. I basted the side seams together to check for fit and then used my serger to stitch the seams. There is a bit of hand sewing on the collars for both the top and jacket.

The jacket (KS 3452) has excellent instructions for adding a zipper. I was a bit concerned about sewing a zipper onto stretch fabric but I needn't have been. The pink Techno Knit is very stable.  As it turned out, I had to sew the zipper twice so got plenty of practice. (I bought a decorative zipper pull, had difficulty taking off the original pull and broke it off. Every project has one UGH moment and this was it!)

The shorts (KS4044) are a super-fast make:  left piece, right piece, elastic. I first traced the pattern onto tracing paper and checked the fit before cutting the fabric. Even with this step the shorts were finished in record time.

The only piece that required design adjustments was the skirt. You don’t usually think of a pencil skirt for golf, however I have sewn this pattern a couple of times and felt confident that it was a great place to start. A note that the Bengaline stretched along the length of the fabric. I was careful to layout the pattern so the stretch would be around the width of my body. The fabric print is random so this worked out just fine.

To make the skirt suitable for golf I made a few simple adjustments: 

Created an A-line shape by adding 3" on each side seam at the hem, then drew a line tapering out from the hip to the hem.

When stitching down the side seam I stopped 4 1/2" from the lower edge to allow for side slits. The hem is 1 ½” which means the slits open 3”. 

The seam allowances on the side slits were then turned under and topstitched, and the skirt was hemmed as usual.   

Two pockets were added: On the upper right side there is a small 4” square pocket big enough for tees, a ball repair tool and ball marker. On the left side a larger pleated pocket holds at least a couple of golf balls.   

And just like that I have a great new golf outfit :)

The athletic knit fabrics were much easier to work with than I expected. I am now on the hunt for more patterns for golf clothes. If only it was as easy to improve my golf game as it is to sew the clothes! 

Take care,   

JANINE  | @janineerm   


 Tips:

  • If you cut more than one pattern at the same time, use Painter’s tape to mark the pieces so you don’t get them mixed up. I also use Painter’s tape to mark the wrong side of the fabric when necessary.
  • A fresh rotary cutter blade makes for beautiful clean cuts on athletic knits.
  • Use a fresh needle in your machine. I used a ballpoint needle for all parts of the project.
  • If you have a serger, use it! 
  • If you do not have a serger, these fabrics can be sewn with a narrow zig zag (I use a .5mm wide x 1.6mm long stitch)
  • When working with unfamiliar fabrics, test all seams and stitches on scraps before sewing. While it’s possible to pick out stitches on knit fabrics, there is always the risk of causing a pull.


Unfortunately Fabric Mart Fabrics sell out quickly!
You can find similar fabrics by shopping the following categories: 
ACTIVEWEAR DOUBLE KNITS

You can also find our selection of Pamela's Patterns HERE.

Comments

  1. Great post filled with lots of useful info. The tips are appreciated.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I'm not much into athletic wear, but your post caught my eye. It is definitely feminine, fun and sporty, and the pops of pink in the skirt ties in very nicely with the tops.

    I was especially taken with the Butterick 6494 top. The picture on the envelope of the pattern would have seemed uninspiring to me, but you really made the pattern your own when you combined the bold pink and white color blocking with the style lines on the pattern. It's a beautiful contrast with a wonderfully slimming and sporty effect.

    Your entire outfit looks great! Thank you for sharing your inspiring makes and helpful tips. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you! I'm not really a fan of athletic wear and the athleisure trend has sort of passed me by. I appreciate your kind words!

      Delete
  3. I totally remember that gorgeous stretch bengaline from Julie's Picks last year ! It's nice to see a post that features the Julie's Picks selections.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It was a really happy surprise to see that the fabrics matched!

      Delete
  4. Your new outfit is very pretty and looks super on you. Your tips are great. Thanks for sharing them.

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Thanks for leaving a comment! All comments are reviewed before posting to help us eliminate spam. Your comment will be posted within 24 hours.

Popular Posts You Might Like

Made by a Fabricista: Living in Linen

As the warmer weather approaches linen is probably one of my favorite fabrics that I feel often gets overlooked.   It drapes well, it’s cool and comfortable and you can make almost anything out of it. For this feature I used 4 yards of designer linen to create a vintage inspired look.  I had an image of a vintage Butterick pattern from the 60’s that I had saved on my Pinterest board.  I love the versatility and easiness of the style.  Since I did not have access to the pattern, I used similar patterns from my stash along with my own pattern drafting to replicate the style.  In the end I created 4 pieces total allowing for interchangeable looks. To create the skirt I used McCall’s pattern 7981 which is almost I identical to the on featured on the vintage pattern.  The shorts pattern was McCall’s 7962.  They are perfect to wear underneath the skirt for a layered look or by themselves. The bralette was self-drafted, I took my basic bodice sloper and moved the dart to create a center fron

Made by a Fabricista: A Fruity Spring Dress

After a year in yoga pants and sweatshirts all I want to sew are dresses. Big, over the top, wonderfully floaty dresses. I loved this fruity chiffon border print from the moment I saw it and knew it had to become one such dress. Much like florals, I absolutely adore fruit prints on fabric, so to find a fabric with both was a real treat. Chiffon is one of those fabrics a lot of sewists seem to be afraid of, and I don't blame them, it can be very tricky to work with. However, I strongly believe in doing difficult things, because the end is so worth it and you have the chance to learn new things along the way. I've only sewn with chiffon a couple times before so I decided to go with a pattern that didn't have any tricky closures and or require a lot of careful fitting. I ended up settling on Simplicity 8872, view A – a maxi length pullover dress with a tiered skirt and cap sleeves. I started with a small bust adjustment (SBA). I do this with nearly every pattern because I tend

Made by a Fabricista: Boho Chic Summer

Hello Gems! I'm so excited to share this month's look as a Fabric Mart Fabricista featuring two gorgeous fabric selections from Fabricmartfabrics.com. If you know me by now, you know that I adore a cool, floor length, boho chic look. There is something so sophisticated, sexy and cool about a free flowing look this time of year made from lightweight breathable fabrics such as the ones used for my most recent Fabricista make. Although the weather is warmer, I still enjoy creating long flowy dresses and free flowing silhouettes to stay cool in the summer and beat the heat. So for my June look, I did a hack of Vogue pattern 9311 and created a voluminous floor length dress with large billowy sleeves and a plunging neckline. I used Fabric Mart's Rayon Framework Crinkle  Challis fabric, which is very light weight and breathable, but not transparent. I love the drape of this fabric and how it just melts onto your body. I added facing down the front and made it a button up so that