Skip to main content

DIY Tutorial: Infinity Scarves

Have a person on your gift list, but have no idea what to get for them? Making a gift is the perfect idea and it will be even more thoughtful than a silly little gift they don't really want anyway.

Infinity scarves are super easy and quick to make. They are called infinity scarves because they look like a continuous piece of fabric in a tubular form. You can make them in almost any type of knit. Knits come in so many different prints that you can make one for every outfit in your closet. 

Here is what you will need: 
- Sewing machine
- 1/2 yard of knit fabric (sweater knit, rayon knit, ITY knit, cotton knit, etc) Should also be 58/60" wide. 
- Thread to match
- Hand sewing needle

1) Fold the 1/2 yard piece of knit in half the long way. Pin along the entire long edge. 


2) Using a thin zig-zag stitch (almost straight stitch), stitch the long edge. I pull slightly on the front and back of the fabric as it goes through the sewing machine so that when the scarf is finished, it can be stretched and the seam does not break. Serge the seam if possible. You should now have a fabric tube, with right sides together. 



3) Put your hand through one open end and grab onto the other open end. Pull the other open end through (still right sides together), matching raw edges (selvedges together) and seams. Pin together.

(Edit 8/14/14, again 12/11/14 --- this is the step where you are sewing the tube ends together. The tube ends are the selvedges. By the comments we received below, this looks to be the place people get confused. I modified the directions the best I can for this step.)

Matching the open ends to create a shorter tube.
  
4) Sew along the raw edges (selvedges of this "tube", making sure to leave an opening to turn right side out. Serge if possible. See left side of photo below:

This is what the scarf should look like before turning it right side out. Left side is the stitched end (selvedge edge)with an opening left for turning. The right side is a folded edge.

5) Turn the entire scarf right side out. Hand stitch the opening closed. 




Tip: You can make a fuller scarf by cutting more than 1/2 yard. 


Make a scarf for everyone on your list! What will you be making as gifts for the holidays?

Comments

  1. Thank you for the idea, now I know what to do with some cute fabric I got in one of your bundles!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanks for the great sharing! Wholesale Scarves was given to me for new hope this past year and it has gotten some heavy use. Thus an idea began to blossom.

    ReplyDelete
  3. This is so cutewholesale scarves or wholesale hats.
    ! Good for you! I cannot wait to get my hands on a copy of this magazine; especially this pattern!

    ReplyDelete
  4. I like the scarf. The directions are good, but you do not tell about connecting the two ends "together" to make a continuous circle.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. See Steps 3, 4

      Delete
    2. I was confused about that step, also. Great idea! Just could have been explained more clearly on that portion...and with adding "connecting the two ends together to make a continuous circle."

      Delete
    3. I sew, and I agree that step was still missing or confusing or both.

      Delete
    4. I sew, and I just do not get it. How do you sew both ends together?!?!?

      Delete
    5. I am confused as well as how to connect the two together.

      Delete
    6. I just modified the directions again in steps 3/4. You want to bring your selvedges together, right sides together. I hope that helps! Let me know if it does not.

      Delete
  5. I love this tutorial AND that fabric! I plan on making one of these this weekend, hope it looks as great as yours!
    Now following :-)

    ReplyDelete
  6. I am so happy to find instructions for sewing these great scarves...how do sew the ends together to make it a continuous circle?

    ReplyDelete
  7. Tuck one end inside of the other end and sew flat.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Tuck one end inside of the other end. I turn the edges of the outside circle under so raw edges do not show. Then sew straight across. That will make a circle. Hope this helps.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Can you use a machine for that or do you have to hand sew it?

      Delete
    2. You use a machine to stitch this. I just modified the directions a bit because that is where people seem to get confused.

      Delete
  9. Thanks for sharing, I'm planning to make couples for Christmas

    ReplyDelete
  10. Is the 60" fabric? Great directions. Thank you so much.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Is the fabric 60"? Thank you for the great instructions.

    ReplyDelete
  12. I made one of there in less than 30 minutes ---LOVE it! Running out now to buy more fabric! Thanks for the great idea and instructions!

    ReplyDelete
  13. I am excited to try this but I don't have a serger or zig zag my machine is old and was my grandmother's. Over 60 years old but in excellent working condition.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Try pinking shears to trim the edge cleanly
      or..
      sew a double seam, another row of stitches close to the first seam
      or..
      if your fabric does not fray (bonus) DO NOTHING

      Delete
  14. Infinity scarf is one of the best gift you can give to your friends or your loved ones, since it is always in on fashion. Infinity scarf can be worn in many ways in different occasion, season and etc. If we know how to knit, we can make one of it for ourself based on what we want. Thanks for sharing this tutorial!

    ReplyDelete
  15. I have to say that it was confusing on step 4, but I had faith that it would work out, If it didn't, then your seam ripper is your best friend.
    Scarf turned out beautifully. I'm going to make these for gifts.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Thanks for a great tutorial. I couldn't fathom it out in my mind, but I just followed step by step and it all worked!

    ReplyDelete
  17. Barb from Reading, PAMay 6, 2018 at 8:54 PM

    I have made several of these scarves and have tried several techniques. The one I find easier is to sew the long edge but leave about a 6" opening about 6" in from one end. You then pull the ends up through that opening and machine stitch the ends together. Pull the whole scarf through that opening while turning right side out and slip stitch that 6" opening closed. Voila! For some reason the long edge is more stable and easier to hand sew closed than the end

    ReplyDelete
  18. You can also twist the ends before you stitch them together. It gives an automatic nice twist to the scarf.

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Thanks for leaving a comment! All comments are reviewed before posting to help us eliminate spam. Your comment will be posted within 24 hours.

Popular Posts You Might Like

Made By A Fabricista: Two Luxury Linen Dresses to Transition from Summer to Fall

Hello Sewing Friends! I’m excited to share my latest Fabricista projects with you all, as these dresses were so nice to sew up. And they are just perfect for this time of year as summer transitions in to Fall here in the Midwest.   I chose 2 gorgeous linen fabrics to work with this month. I have to say, these are two of the loveliest linen fabrics I have ever worked with in my decades of sewing. These 100% Italian Linen fabrics are so unique and just an amazing quality.    The pattern I chose was one that I picked up during a Fabric Mart Fabrics pattern sale. I don’t sew a lot with Indie patterns and so when I saw the sale, I took advantage and stocked up so I could try out a few brands. This Wildwood Wrap Dress from Sew House Seven pattern company has been on my to-sew list for months and I knew these linen fabrics would be perfect for the design.  I started out with this gorgeous solid linen as my wearable muslin. Since it was a new to me pattern company, I knew I needed to test t

Made By A Fabricista: Silky Prints for a Tropical Vacation

Hello again!   I want to share with you my latest project using silky prints. My family had been planning to go to the Virgin Islands for a vacation. For this trip I wanted loose-fitting outfits. When the summer Vogue patterns were released, I fell in love with the vintage Vogue V1886 caftan. It is ankle length and the sleeves fell elegantly to the hemline, hitting the arm slightly above the elbows. It has a scooped back, which would make it comfortable in hot weather. There are side panels, but no seams. I could wear this relaxing under an umbrella during the day or for an evening stroll to enjoy the breeze on the beach. FM’s polyester lightweight charmeuse silky prints caught my eye. Even though I swore I would never again sew slippery fabrics, the coastal mountain print on the fabric (SKU UQA7666r) was hard to resist.  The moonstone blue/berry pink/medium blue/taupe were cool relaxing colors. While looking at the first fabric, I saw another silky print (SKU UQA7667r) that was ha

Made By A Fabricista: YouTube Edition | Hannah - Full Bust Adjustment

When I first started sewing I quickly realized the size I was cutting out in shirts and dresses wasn’t fitting my shoulders.  Why you may ask? I was only measuring according to my bust measurement which made my tops too big in the shoulders. After some research and asking in Facebook groups I learned I needed to do a Full Bust Adjustment on all of my patterns.  I watched tons of videos and read books on how to do a FBA and I found one way that continues to be my favorite way to this fit adjustment.  The pivot and slide method has become my go to for every FBA I do.  In this video I walk you through the steps to help you get the right fit for your bust area. Feel free to leave a comment if you have questions, I am here to help you on your sewing/fitting journey!  HANNAH    |  @modistra.sews Unfortunately Fabric Mart Fabrics sell out quickly! You can find similar fabrics by shopping the following category CHALLIS .