Skip to main content

Made by a Fabricista: Minoru Jacket Part One - Adding a Front Pocket

I had the opportunity to take a few days off during the holidays and my top priority was to do some sewing! It felt great to get in front of my sewing machine again! I had just been serviced a week before and it sewed like a breeze. One of the patterns I wanted to try was Sewaholic's Minoru Jacket. I had Fabric Mart's Charcoal Organic Cotton Twill in mind for this jacket along with a cotton print from Marc Jacobs (no longer available) and the teal pongee lining. This was my first Sewaholic pattern but was excited to give it a try. I was drawn to it because of the RTW look of this jacket. Many of the seams are top-stitched (which I love!) and elastic is inserted in the back of the jacket cinching the waist.


The directions were clear and pictures easy to understand as well. The basic jacket is constructed in the first few steps, so once you have the fit, you can focus on the details that this jacket has.

I made a few of my own additions including front pockets and a lined hood. This post will include the front pocket tutorial. (Stay tuned for a post about the lined hood!)

Front Pocket Modification:

I really like having pockets in my jackets. I carry a purse, but I like to have my phone at my fingertips, not stuck at the bottom of my purse! I browsed around to web to see what other people were doing. I saw a front pocket adaption on pinterest, but they did not blog about it. So I thought I would!

Before I started sewing, I had to construct the pockets. I tested the pocket out on my muslin to get a good idea of placement. I researched similar pockets found in RTW and drew the placement on the muslin. (See the yellow line?) The slope begins center front, just below the waist and ends at the hip.



I took some pattern paper and traced the pocket pattern directly from the muslin. Of course I tested the pocket on the muslin first, but once I had it right, I cut two pieces out of the twill, making sure you have pockets going in different directions.



Since I am lining the hood (I will explain later), I wanted to accent the front of the jacket with the pretty lining too. I cut 1 1/4" bias strips to go along the top of the pocket. Using a 3/8" seam allowance, I sewed the bias strip to the top of the pocket, right sides together. 



Then I pressed the seam allowance toward the bias strip, followed by pressing down 3/8" along the raw edge of the bias strip. 



I wanted to make the bias strip look like piping, so from the back of the pocket, I folded the bias strip almost in half, allowing about 3/16" peak through to the front of the jacket. 

 


Then I top-stitched the bias strip, adding yet just another RTW touch. Baste the pocket to the jacket front and finish the jacket like normal.

(Top-stitching over piping.)


(Finished top-stitching.)

I added some stitching to the sides of the pockets to reinforce them. I used a compacted zig-zag stitch.



Now lay out the pockets on your front jacket pieces. You want to make sure the piping meets at the same place along the zipper front. 



Sew the rest of the jacket per directions. When hemming the jacket, you will notice some extra bulk because of the extra layer you created with the pocket. I cut off the bottom of the front piece to minimize the bulk. The hem is top-stitched on this jacket, therefore the top-stitching creates a bottom to your pocket. Stay tuned for a tutorial on a lined hood and finished garment pictures! 

~Julie

Comments

  1. I'm interested to see the finished garment. It looks to me like you're doing pockets all across the front, from the side seam all the way to the zipper, and slanted up toward the center? What an utterly cool design!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is being done on the front of the jacket. I will be posting a finished picture in a few days!

      Delete
    2. I can't wait to see the finished project. How inspirational!

      Delete

Post a Comment

Thanks for leaving a comment! All comments are reviewed before posting to help us eliminate spam. Your comment will be posted within 24 hours.

Popular Posts You Might Like

Made by a Fabricista: A Work Wardrobe with a $50 Fabric Budget

Can you save money by sewing your own clothes?  Well, that all depends on a lot of factors!  I decided to challenge myself to make a new Spring work wardrobe with a $50 budget for fabric.  I know, I know- that doesn't include your patterns, notions and miscellaneous things like interfacing and lining.  For me, those are already sunk costs, because I already have them.  By ordering during one of Fabric Mart's $2/$3/$4 sales, I was able to make 8 items- 2 pants, 1 skirt, 1 dress, and 3 tops.  Here's my exact order:


This took me about 6 weeks once I started.  I usually sew after dinner for about an hour or two every day.  It's my relaxation time.  I dove right in the deep end with the jacket first.
I absolutely love this fabric!  It is so bright and cheery.    I made the jacket with Vogue 2957, an out of print Anne Klein designer pattern.


The fabric is a Milly Cady suiting which I found challenging to work with.  It feels delightful, but it is tough as nails.   I started…

Fabricista Guest Post: "Julie's Picks" Goes to the Opera

Hello, fellow fabric enthusiasts and sewers alike ! My name is Mary Martha and I am thrilled to be presenting a guest post for Fabric Mart's Fabricista blog. As a bit of background, I fell madly in love with opera in 2015 when I attended my first performance in a movie theater as part of the Metropolitan Opera's "Live in HD" simulcasts, which projects live staged operas in New York City into cinemas worldwide via satellite. (They're fantastic !) Since the start, I have dressed the part of the characters when attending these performances, beginning with outfits fashioned from scarves and skirts in my mother's closet to more ornate costumes. It was during this time that I taught myself to sew using a sewing machine and I haven't looked back ─ my life was changed forever !
In December 2018, I subscribed to Julie's Picks swatch club as an educational experience: I wanted to expand my knowledge of different fabrics besides the typical polyester satins I h…