Skip to main content

Made by a Fabricista: Addicted to the Granville Shirt

I think I have an addiction and I'm not afraid to admit it...

I'm addicted to a certain buttondown shirt...the Granville Shirt from Sewaholic Patterns

I have already made three versions of this figure flattering shirt and I'm not stopping there! I've made it in flannel, silk charmeuse and cotton chambray.

Here's the cotton flannel version. Of course I picked a plaid for my first go around. It's one thing to try out a pattern for the first time and then pick a plaid that can be unforgiving if you do something wrong! You can read more about this shirt HERE



Next, I made the shirt from a silk charmeuse. Again, I picked a printed that needed to be matched AND work with a bit slippery silk! Why do I do this to myself? 



I ended up using what I believe was the wrong side of the fabric. You can see from the photo below that the left side is shiny, the right side brighter and more crisp. I used the brighter side as the face. The shiny side was kind of washed out and I really didn't like the way it looked. This fabric was a sample cut that never made it on the website. 



For the inside collar band, plackets and cuffs, I chose an ivory silk charmeuse from my stash. It matched the ivory in the print perfectly! (I love when a plan comes together.) I also used the backside of the ivory charmeuse because I liked the matte look of the backside.





If you want the look of an expensive buttondown shirt, I would recommend making it from a silk, but take care in sewing whether it's in the construction or top-stitching. You want the silk shirt to be top notch! I serged all the seams because I felt that the charmeuse could handle it. Some of you may decide to use a french seam, but I honestly was a bit lazy! 

Lastly, I kept it simple with a tiny polka dot chambray shirt. The polka dots are woven into the fabric and are small enough that there is no need to match them! (YAY!) I put pockets on the front (they are straight, just doesn't show that way in the photo because of the way I'm standing.) 



I chose a cotton print from my stash for the collar stand, plackets and cuffs -- aren't the little birdies cute?! 




I have a few other Granville's in the planning stages, one in particular for a co-worker. But after that one is finished I'll probably take a little break and sew some other summer projects. What are you sewing right now? 

Comments

  1. They all turned out great, I love a good button down shirt, they are always wardrobe workhorses!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Wow, I never thought of making this in a silk, it's beautiful!

    ReplyDelete
  3. I love the buttons on the multi-print, and the contrast plackets and cuffs/collar stand. I do want to nitpick one thing, though, that's been bothering me when I've seen it elsewhere as well as here, and I apologize for being a picky twit about it: this shirt has a button front, but isn't "buttondown", which refers to a collar that buttons at the corners to the body of the shirt. Again, sorry for the negativity--please keep up the good work!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Wendy, Thanks for the clarification. I did not know there was a difference. I have always called this type of shirt a buttondown shirt.

      Delete
  4. i never have "too many" shirts. these are great!--anne

    ReplyDelete
  5. I love every single one of those shirts..

    ReplyDelete
  6. Nice shirts! I love the bird print accents on the last one.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Lovely shirts! All of them are winners! You have the fit to perfection. You're very talented!

    ReplyDelete
  8. Thanks everyone for the comments! I love making them and am going to make more!

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Thanks for leaving a comment! All comments are reviewed before posting to help us eliminate spam. Your comment will be posted within 24 hours.

Popular Posts You Might Like

Made By A Fabricista: Summer Sewing is in Full Effect

Hi Guys! Today I’m coming to you with this easy, breeze caftan from Simplicity Patterns because summer sewing is in full effect! While looking through my pattern stash, I came across McCall’s 8413. This pattern is described as McCall’s Sewing Pattern Misses’ Caftan In Two Lengths.  This is an Easy to Sew caftan in two lengths has ruched front with drawstring that ties at the bottom, V-shaped neckline, dolman sleeves and narrow hem. View C caftan has contrast on the left side. OK, let’s get into it because I have a few things to share and say about this pattern. When I first saw this pattern, I purchased it because I loved the ruching in the front. I think that ruching can hide just about any “imperfection” you might think you have. Now, I must mention that this is one of the few caftan patterns I’ve ever purchased because I’m petite and feel like I get lost in all that fabric.  Well, I didn’t even realize this was a caftan pattern until I read the pattern description while writing this

Made By A Fabricista: Youtube Edition - Marty

This month was a little different. I decided to take the opportunity to really beef up my summer wardrobe with three new dresses. And since finishing them, they have become my everyday uniform. I started playing with this pattern back in March when I tried, and failed, to make a dress the night before my cousin's wedding. (don't worry I had a backup dress) The pattern that I used for these dresses was my third iteration. And honestly, as with everything your practice, it just got better. These dresses hug every inch of my body and hide everything else. I mean, what else would you want from a dress right? I hope you enjoy the making process as much as I did and I'll see you all next time.  MARTY   |  @scrappypatterns Unfortunately Fabric Mart Fabrics sell out quickly! You can find similar fabrics by shopping the following categories, CHALLIS .

Made By A Fabricista: Embracing the linen wrinkles!

Hello wonderful sewists! Today I have a project that I have been meaning to sew for a while, but you know how it goes. Too many ideas, throw in some analysis paralysis, so many, many gorgeous fabrics to wear, and then, bam! Eons have passed. I’m working on sewing the plans that have been in my head the longest, which brings us to this dashing summer frock.  This is the Style Arc Esther Woven Dress. The style is intended for lighter wovens and the design is ripe for color blocking with the included center front and back seams. You could make right and left sides match; go full checkerboard with opposing rear right and left front; or just use four prints and go wild! I’m sticking with the most basic of blocking and splitting the dress down the center.  Importantly, I got matching threads for each linen color for all the topstitching. Matchy matchy is the name of the game in my book. I added bonus bartacks to keep the side seam pockets forward facing.  Medium Sky Blue and Light Steel Blue