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New Arrival: New Thread Theory Design Inc. Patterns

I'm proud to announce that we have the newest patterns from Thread Theory Design Inc. Based out of British Colombia, Canada, the husband and wife duo of Morgan and Matthew, create a line of men's clothing patterns. There is a definite void of men's patterns in the sewing world and thankfully they help fill part of the void. I interviewed Morgan last summer during the 'In the Studio' series. 


We are now carrying the Finlayson SweaterJutland Pant and the Camas Blouse (which is a women's pattern). 

Men can be picky about their handmade garments. They don't want them to look too handmade. They need to be just right! There are a lot of factors to consider -- techniques used to make it look store-bought, ease of use and fabrics.  


I think the hardest part can be selecting the right fabrics. Men's clothing is so much plainer than women's clothing and a bit more rugged. I took a look through my husband's closet and I found - medium-heavy weight pants fabric such as cotton twill, polyester/rayon blends (for dress pants) and denim. None of his pants had stretch like there is in women's clothes. He has a number of buttondown shirts for work, which are mostly cotton or cotton/polyester blends. On to the knits in his closet -- mostly the performance knits such as the fabric used in golf polo shirts. Then of course the basic t-shirt knit that usually doesn't have stretch (or lycra) and is more of an interlock or heavier jersey. And lastly, fleece, sweatshirt fleece and flannel finished off the list.

The Finlayson Sweater is a grown-up version of your typical hoodie. For this pattern you want find medium-heavy weight knits such as heavy interlock, heavy slub knit, lightweight sweatshirt fleece, french terry or any other medium-heavy knit. If you're lucky enough to find a matching rib knit, that would be suitable for the cuffs and hem.


The Jutland Pant is a casual work or hiking pant or classic denim pant. Omit the cargo pockets and create a more dressy pant to wear to the office. It also includes a variety of features that make it suitable for hiking or more rugged use such as hem and knee reinforcement, an optional lining for uncomfortable waterproof fabrics and more. For a casual look, use pant weight fabrics such as denim, twill and other cotton and synthetic bottomweights. For a dressier look, use heavier suiting fabrics in wool, cotton, or polyester blends. I wouldn't recommend light weight suiting fabrics because it may look sloppy on a pattern that is slated for heavier fabrics. 


For those of you that don't want to sew for men or your man is picky and doesn't want to be sewn for, they have come out with the Camas Blouse. This pattern is to be made from knit fabrics. The intent is to have a comfortable shirt that feels like a t-shirt, but looks better than a t-shirt.


The recommended fabrics include lightweight stretch knits such as rayon, silk, modal, cotton or bamboo jersey. We always have a great selection of jersey knits which you can check out HERE

When selecting the fabrics to use in these men's patterns, look at men's clothing like I did. I would never use an ITY knit for my husband's shirts. Nor would I use a ponte knit for them. If they look like a women's fabric and you've never seen them in men's clothing, don't use them. Stick with cotton and blend knits in various light-medium to medium-heavy weight. Don't pick tissue or really like jerseys. It is too light for men. For bottoms, pick heavier fabrics (at least for Thread Theory patterns). If you're going to make more professional, office garments, then you may consider lighter weight suitings such as tropical weights or rayon blend suitings. And of course shirting fabric for buttondown shirts.

We carry  entire Thread Theory Design Inc. pattern line. Check them out HERE. And don't forget, Father's Day is around the corner and what better gift to give is a handmade gift!

Have you ever sewed for the men in your life? How is sewing for men different than women? Do you have any suggestions for our readers?

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