Skip to main content

Made by a Fabricista: Color Blocked Linen


One technique that I love to see in clothing, but rarely use in my own sewing, is color blocking.  Why?  Well, it can be tricky to mix fabrics of different weights or compositions.  I recently ordered two pieces of linen, and when I opened up the box, I thought- "Ooh, these look pretty good together!  The weights are pretty similar.  Let's do some color blocking!".

I had 2-1/2 yards each of both the blue and this fawn color, and was able to squeeze out 3 garments. The blue color is sold out, but Fabric Mart has lots of other linen in stock.   The first was a dress from a 2012 issue of Burda magazine.  It was so memorable, that it was always in the back of my mind for when I found the right fabric.  Here is their version:


And here is mine:


This was a technically challenging dress because I had to do a full bust adjustment, which with that wacky front was a real headscratcher.  I had to do two muslins to get it right, and then sewing those curves- aaaacckk!  But I do think it turned out pretty cool.  Yes, it is wrinkly.  Linen is just that way.  I don't mind it because it is just so comfortable!  I love wearing linen so much that I can live with the wrinkles.  Ponte would be a great choice for those who hate wrinkles but want to try color blocking.

I lowered the neckline 2" and eliminated the zipper because I could pull it over my head.  I also used bias binding instead of facings on the neckline.  The dress has pockets, but they are placed abnormally low- probably because when they designed it with the zipper, the pockets would have needed to be below the end of the zipper.   I would definitely move them up if I make it again.



Because it's fall, and you never know what the temperature is going to be, I also wanted to make a jacket.  I wanted something flowy and organic in shape to go with the dress design.  I decided on this kimono style jacket, Simplicity 8172.  This is a fabulous jacket, and super easy to sew, which was a blessing after sewing the dress!

Here it is from the back:



I looked in my closet for some other things to wear this jacket with, and lo and behold, the thing that it looked best with was the Scout Tee that I had made back in 2014 for Fabric Mart's Fashion Challenge! This was a top that I made from second hand sari pieces.


I was thrilled with how well these two pieces work together!  I accented the waist seam with a piece of gold sequinned trim.


I had enough fabric to make one more top.  I decided on a tunic with the majority being the blue linen, and using the fawn as the contrast.


For this one, I used Vogue 8533.  This is an older pattern, but there are tons of similar tunic top patterns out there. 




I used another beaded trim to highlight the seam line.  My neighbor, who was following my progress, said that the trim was like icing on a cake- the tunic by itself was good, like plain chocolate cake, but with the trim, it was like chocolate frosting on it- making it great.  I love that analogy!



These pants are made from ITY knit and an elastic waist pants pattern.  I made them several years ago, and loved them, but, honestly, they languished in the closet for lack of the right top to wear with them.  I think I've found it now!!!  I really like this combo.  And it's perfect for the transitional weather that we have in October.


So, this was a fun exercise in creativity as well as sharpening up my technical skills!  Have you ever tried color blocking?  Do you ever use beaded trims?

Happy Sewing!  
Ann

Comments

  1. Your posts are always a favorite with me. The garments are wonderful. With Fall ready to arrive I am thinking about some wonderful wool from Fabric Mart. Some sort of blend in a light weight. Your info in very helpful and I am a fan of bias instead of neck facings whenever I can. I am on the lookout for this pattern and fabric. Thank-you for the inspiration.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thank you, Pat! Hope you find the perfect wool!

    ReplyDelete
  3. lovely! Your creative use of fabric is pretty amazing

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Patty! There are so many possibilities with beautiful fabric!

      Delete
  4. You did such a fabulous job with this linen!! I just love all the pieces. The taupe and blue color combo works beautifully for the dress and kimono top. Your pieces are always such an inspiration!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you! It's a great color combination that I need to remember to use again!

      Delete
  5. Ann, this is such a lovely outfit and that tunic is over the moon!

    ReplyDelete
  6. You made 3 great garments, and the dress is my favorite! Those colors are great paired together, and look so great on you!

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Thanks for leaving a comment! All comments are reviewed before posting to help us eliminate spam. Your comment will be posted within 24 hours.

Popular Posts You Might Like

Made By A Fabricista: Fall Capsule Wardrobe with Pattern Emporium

Hello fellow fabric lovers! At long last the very best of all seasons has commenced and I'm ready to embrace the impending chill. When Fabric Mart held their sale for 65% off knits (!) I had a ridiculously fun time curating a little collection for myself to sew into a wardrobe that would be perfect for both warm and cool days since fall likes to tease with temperature changes. Can you even believe this whole stack (and thread!!) came in just under $50?! Mind blown. I wear a lot of light wovens in summer to keep cool, and switching to more cozier knits really marks a welcome change in my wardrobe.  There are many designers I simply adore, but the reason I chose Pattern Emporium's patterns for this project is because the garments are already created to pair well with many other designs in the collection. Since I've previously sewn all of these particular items and own just about the entire expanse of PE's patterns, this was a relatively easy decision and I had no doubts a

Made By A Fabricista: Chanel Inspired Boucle Jacket

I've always admired the iconic look of a Chanel Boucle Suit Jacket. The Chanel Jacket style is versatile and classic. Over its rich 100-year life span, the jacket has appeared with collars, zippers, buttons, pockets, trim, fringe, and many other variations. It is worn by everyone from movie stars, royalty, first ladies, and just everyday women. Why? Because the luxurious silhouette, boucle fabric, and tailored fit look great on everyone! Having admired the Chanel Boucle Suit Jacket for most of my life, I set out to acquire one. After a few Google searches for Chanel jackets and a glaringly steep $6,000 price tag (believe it or not, that was for pre-owned Chanel.) I knew the only way I'd ever wear a jacket like that is if I made one. Enter in $50 of fabric from Fabric Mart, $30 in notions, a $10 sewing pattern, and my Chanel dreams could become a reality.  I started my Chanel look-a-like jacket by researching sewing patterns that would help me capture that iconic look. I wanted

Made by a Fabricista: My Olive Green Tamarack

Hello everyone! I hope you all are having a great week! I am here to share my latest make, a Tamarack Jacket from Grainline Studio . This pattern has been out for a while. I am so late to the party, but better late than never, right? I am super happy how my Tamarack turned out! Are you ready? Let's go! Fabric Making an olive color jacket was one of the items on my wish list for a while. Unfortunately the quilted jacketing I used has sold out. When I saw this plaid flannel , I thought it would be pretty if I placed the red on the cuffs. I wanted the red to peek out when I fold over the cuffs. Pattern Alterations I used size 6, shortened 2" for the bodice, and shortened 1" from the sleeve. If I make it again, I would add 1" back to the sleeve. (I am 5'1")  That way, I can fold over cuffs, but I don't lose the length of the sleeves. Also, I would probably go with one size bigger to wear with more layers of clothes underneath. When I made the sample jacket,