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Made by a Fabricista: Snakeskin Faux Jumpsuit


 Animal print is almost always in style, but this fall it's especially on trend! I've got plenty of cheetah/leopard print makes, but nothing in snakeskin so when I saw this cream and black double brushed polyester (DBP) knit I had to have it. In addition to the print I love the feel of DBP, it's so soft, doesn't hold wrinkles and holds up to multiples washes! This fabric is sold out, but they have plenty of other double brushed knits online.


I recently added a few (read: several) patterns to my collection thanks to an annual sale hosted by the local American Sewing Guild. This was totally accidental as I was there to donate fabric and patterns NOT buy. LOL Anyway in that lot of patterns was Vogue 8738 (OOP). I grabbed it thinking it was a jumpsuit, but its actually two pieces which is almost better as I need more separates. Though I'm not sure when this was printed it has a 90's vibe and the 90s are making a comeback (whether we like it or not!) so I snagged this pattern.


I had an idea for a snakeskin jumpsuit early in the summer, though at that time I was envisioning a challis. So I searched my collection for a knit jumpsuit and remembered V8738, which was even better because separates would obviously get more wear especially in a bold print like this one.

Both pieces are quick sews. The tank is just three pieces; the draped front, the pleated back yoke and the lower back. One odd thing to note is that the edges of the back yoke are never finished according the instructions as you finish off the rest of the armhole prior to attaching it. I simply folded over and sewed a narrow hem. Next time I will attached the three pieces and then hem everything. Another thing I'll added next time is fusible hem tape, this DBP or any stretchy knit is easy to stretch while hemming so the stability would have been nice.



The pants are even easier as they have just two pieces, the leg and the waistband. However because the leg pieces is both the front and back leg combined it is a large piece and I had to cut it on the floor. There were no finished measurement so I cut the largest size, a 18. I ended up taking it in a bit more at the front and back crotch since there are no side seams. Next time I will cut a 16 or even a 14 with a stretchier knit like this DBP. I would also add about 2 inches to the hem, although I feel these are designed to hit at the ankle.



Although I admit the two pieces together might be a bit much, I promise you that it is incredibly comfortable. This brushed poly is so soft it's like wearing pajamas. I do think that the belt is necessary to pull of this outfit. Additionally the top is more wearable than the pants, as the pants can conger up images of 90s "hammer pants". Still I truly don't think the pants are that bad as the drape is in the front leg instead of the crotch.

Which look is your fave?

See you next month

Tiffany
Tipstitched

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