Skip to main content

Made by a Fabricista: A Non-Stuffy Suit


I've been contemplating looking for a new job, and realized that I don't really have any outfits that I would feel comfortable interviewing in.  I've got a lot of semi-dressy tops and dresses, but nothing in the "suit" category.  So, I've decided to focus on making a few items that would be appropriate for an interview, but not so "stuffy" that I wouldn't want to wear them for anything else.  I didn't put a button on this jacket, but after taking pictures in the wind, I may need to rethink that!  I had to hold the jacket down for the photo above.


For this suit ensemble, I used a Red-Violet Poly/Rayon/Lycra Stretch suiting for the jacket, a Dark Navy/Light Blue Pinstripe Wool Crepe suiting for the pants, and Pearl Polyester/Lycra ITY Knit for the top (Vogue 9006).   The pinstripe wool is really nice- not a bit scratchy.  It's Italian, and you can feel the quality.  Here is a closer look at it:



The poly rayon lycra suiting was really nice to work with too.  Unfortunately, it has sold out, but there are some really nice suitings in Fabric Mart's Suiting category.  It had a nice drape, and that was good because the back of my jacket had a pleat that needed a nicely draping fabric for it to work.


I was going for an unconstructed, unlined jacket look with wide leg pants, and I found this pattern, Vogue 9176 that had both!  Here's the line drawings:

I made the pattern as is, except I was disappointed that neither the pants or the jacket designs included pockets!  I mean, gee whiz, how unpractical!  I keep a few patterns for pocket styles in my cutting table drawer, so that I can add them if a pattern doesn't include a pocket pattern.  I have templates for a kangaroo front pocket, side seam dress pockets, curved patch pockets, and side seam pants pockets.  So, for this pattern, I pulled out both the curved patch pocket and side seam pants pocket templates.
Here's a photo of the cardboard template of the inside of the curved patch pocket, and the interfaced piece.  I only interface to the seamline.   I stitch at the seamline, and then run some basting stitches at the corners, so that I can pull it to fit the template.  This makes it easier to press and get a nice curved edge. 


For placing it on the jacket, I like to use Wonder Tape, instead of pins.  There are several brands of a similar product, but I have found the Collins brand to be the best.  Some of the others aren't very sticky. 

What you do is run a strip around the inside edge, then peel off the plastic side of the tape.  It can then be positioned on your project.  If you try it on, and don't like where it is, it's easy to peel it off and reposition it.  Then you just stitch it on.  The Wonder Tape holds it in place more securely than pins, so that it won't move on you while you are sewing the pocket in place.




I made a second top out of a striped double knit, that you might have in your stash as well, as it was in the $1.99 section for a while!  I just had one yard of it, and used a really simple pattern for it- Kwik Sew 3233.




I'm happy with all of these pieces.  Even if I don't interview for a new job, I can definitely see wearing these to my current job at an elementary school, as they are bright and cheery, and with the added pockets- practical too! 

Happy Sewing!

Ann

Comments

  1. Really beautifully done Ann! I especially love those pants!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you! I'm excited to have them in my wardrobe.

      Delete
  2. Those pants are wonderful. Thanks for the tip about pocket styles, I redraw one every time.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Pat. So many patterns are missing them these days!

      Delete
  3. Lovely separates. Fun color jacket, but still polished and professional looking

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Thanks for leaving a comment! All comments are reviewed before posting to help us eliminate spam. Your comment will be posted within 24 hours.

Popular Posts You Might Like

Made by a Fabricista: Spring is for Shirtdress

I love shirt dresses! My pattern collection reflects this (I may or may not have eight shirt dress patterns) but somehow my closet does not. I have just two DIY shirt dresses (Mimi G's Katie dress and Simplicity 8546) and maybe two RTW versions. So it's high time that I added some to my wardrobe.


This polyester blouse weight twill by Milly has the perfect weight and drape for a relaxed shirt dress. If you prefer a more structured look, stick to a cotton shirting or light weight sateen. I loved this fabric and print so much that I grabbed both colorways. Unfortunately this fabric is sold out, but you can browse other shirtings and blouse weight fabrics here.


This fabric has a somewhat slinky feel, but isn't truly slippery. There's also a slight sheen without being shiny like a satin. It was easy to cut and sew, but I did get a few snags when pinning so make sure you use sharp pins and a fresh machine needle. I serged my pieces before assembling the pattern because as m…

Fabricista Guest Post: "Julie's Picks" Goes to the Opera

Hello, fellow fabric enthusiasts and sewers alike ! My name is Mary Martha and I am thrilled to be presenting a guest post for Fabric Mart's Fabricista blog. As a bit of background, I fell madly in love with opera in 2015 when I attended my first performance in a movie theater as part of the Metropolitan Opera's "Live in HD" simulcasts, which projects live staged operas in New York City into cinemas worldwide via satellite. (They're fantastic !) Since the start, I have dressed the part of the characters when attending these performances, beginning with outfits fashioned from scarves and skirts in my mother's closet to more ornate costumes. It was during this time that I taught myself to sew using a sewing machine and I haven't looked back ─ my life was changed forever !
In December 2018, I subscribed to Julie's Picks swatch club as an educational experience: I wanted to expand my knowledge of different fabrics besides the typical polyester satins I h…