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Made by a Fabricista: All about the seams.


Did you think I was done with chartreuse? Well...I'm not! I decided to add another level of gray and chartreuse to the suit I made back in December (see here).


As soon as I saw this wool and cashmere double faced coating by Michael Kors I knew I had to have it. It was offered in several color combos, but quite a few are sold out. Check out the available colors and all the other amazing coating fabrics here. When it arrived I was blown away, not just by the colors (which I already knew I loved), but by the softness of the brushed finish. It's divine!


Since this wool is double faced I knew I had to make something that would show both sides. I initially thought of a belted cape, like McCalls 6209, but ultimately decided on Butterick 6244. Not only does the waterfall collar show both sides, but thanks to the flat felled seams it is also reversible.


It you haven't sewn flat felled seams it's surprisingly simple, if a bit time consuming. I will note that it is a bit trickier on heavier materials (like this wool). Start by sewing your seam as usual then follow the steps below.

  1. Trim one side of the seam allowance to 1/4"
  2. Fold the longer seam allowance over the trimmed side to the seam stitching
  3. Fold over encasing the trimmed seam allowance 
  4. Edgestitch the seam
  5. Finished flat seam
The only seam in this pattern that doesn't call for flat felled seams is the armsyce. Here (as well as  the underarm seam simply because I couldn't figure out how to do a flat felled seam there) I opted for a french seams. A French seam is also rather simple, though they might take a tad bit of thinking ahead. For French seams you start by sewing the wrong sides together. This feels weird and I had to think twice on this project as the fabric is double faced. See the steps below.


  1. Sew wrong sides together with a little less than have the called for seam allowance (here about 1/4" due to the 5/8" seam). Press the seam
  2. Flip the seam so that the right sides are together.
  3. Pin and sew the seam with a slightly larger that half of the seam allowance 3/8" (or just enough to encase the raw edges from the other side.)
  4. Now there is a clean seam on the right side and a encased seam on the wrong side. 
*Optional: You could edgestitch this seam and it would look similar to the flat felled.

I find the French seam easier to sew as it eliminates the cutting step, but both have their uses. Are you meticulous about your inside finishings? What's your favorite seam finish?

See you next month!

Tiffany
TipStitched.com


Comments

  1. Just gorgeous! I purchased some of the Michael Kors Wool as well. I just love it!

    ReplyDelete
  2. wow that looks great. How clever to make it reversible. Definitely worth the effort

    ReplyDelete
  3. I purchased this too! Are the front edges left raw?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They're are currently, but they are fraying. So I'm either going to have to bind them in bias, serge or do a narrow hem.

      Delete
  4. That is a beautiful outfit! I bought the mango/oatmeal colorway and I am trying to choose a
    pattern to use both sides. The hand of this wool/cashmere is just wonderful.



    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Doesn't it feel amazing?! I definitely vote reversible if possible or something with a hi-low hem.

      Delete
  5. Your coat, simply put, is absolutely stunning & looks beautiful on you.

    ReplyDelete

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