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Made by a Fabricista: A Spring Jumpsuit

Happy Saturday Loves!
Have you ever fell in love with a pattern and made it 3 times? I have only found a handful of patterns that are truly a great fit directly from the pattern envelope without having to make a significant amount of modifications. This is true for McCall's M8009, a jumpsuit pattern.
The minute I saw the bodice of the pattern,  it reminded me so much of a dress I saved on Pinterest years ago. I have been waiting to make the dress for years but fear got the best of me not wanting to draft or modify a pattern from scratch.
When McCall's released M8009 last year,  I knew it was a must make. I made it first in a rayon from my stash and did not stop the night until most of it was done after falling in love with the fit of the bodice. The size 12 grading the midriff section to the 14 waist fits perfectly from the pattern envelope.  For the pants, the size 14 with a few of my regular crotch pants adjustments were made as well as lengthening the pattern by 4.5 inches.
When I saw KeKe Palmer the host on Good Day America, in December,  I was sold on making yet another one for my February blog post. I checked daily to see if Fabric Mart new designer arrivals included a similar challis fabric. This muted olive, black and white fabric was so perfect and I knew that I had to grab a few yards to make it before Spring. Unfortunately, it is sold out but here are some other amazing solid and print challis fabric perfect for this make.
Over the years, I have learned that Big 4 pattern instructions are not always clear.  For the bodice, the pattern instruction did not say to understitch which I personally feel is a must because this bodice is lined. To make my life easier, a zig-zag foot is so perfect as the clear area allows you to use the seam as a guide to understitch.
In addition for the midriff section, the pattern instruction did not say to apply interface for stability but based on my years of sewing experience, I knew right away that certain areas must be stabilized especially waistband areas and zippers. 
Also, when working with challis or silky fabrics,  avoid using a seam ripper and be careful with pins as the fabric tend to fray easily.  From a previous lesson when working with my first version, I decided to use clear tape to mark the main part of the bodice as this is lined.
Moreover, using a rotary cutter will make your life so much easy when you cut.  Personally, I use both weights and pins when cutting out my patterns.
I have shared and saved a few steps creating the bodice on my Instagram highlights section with the first and second versions. I even wrote a PERSONAL blog post comparing and sharing the pros and cons of working with cotton versus rayon.
I absolutely love this pattern especially the bodice and definitely plan to make a 4th and 5th version in a romper and dress this spring and summer. The flow, the feel of challis is absolutely perfect and I had so much fun shooting this jumpsuit with a professional photographer Michael Ernie who captured the beauty of this jumpsuit.  
I added elastic in the sleeves for a more versatile look! Rock it UP or DOWN.
Don't always judge how a pattern will look on you based on the model or the cover. Go to the design lines and see the cut and shape.  Mix and match the views, modify the pattern to fit your personal style and make it your own.   Do you only make the views that are shared on the envelope? I always shy away from just the exact views and ignore the model and focus on the line drawing that is featured on the envelope.  I personally feel that pattern companies should embrace our "Sewing Community" and feature  US "sewists" on their patterns envelopes to market their patterns.  If given the opportunity, I would definitely do it. Would love to hear your thoughts below.
I am excited about my 2020 makes even more as I will be taking my first sewing class at a local college- couture design. One of my goals in 2020 is to continue to inspire other women and men too to learn a craft that brings joy. Sewing has connected me with so many diverse people across the globe and they have inspired me to invest in my craft.  In support of Women's History Month in March, two of my colleagues (educators like myself) who are my sewing students will be collaborating with me on my next post. 
Sewing has been the therapy that we all need after a long day of teaching. I will be using my personal platform and voice to bring Community school programs back in our local school district and Home Economics into our Middle School curriculum which we have seen over the years to have slowly faded away. I hope that my voice will not only empower sewists but other educators, lawmakers and community leaders in my local city.
Here is a beautiful top I made for Valentine's day by hacking the Erica Dress pattern I shared in my January blogpost. I shortened the sleeves and neckband, added buttons in the back and made it a cute top.  I had about a yard of designer Ponte knit from a previous Fabric Mart which is all you need for this top.  Don't forget to stop by my Instagram page and view my saved highlights with tips and behind the scenes of my jumpsuit and this Erica dress hack.  Thank you so much for reading and be sure to check back next month and read all about my collaboration project.

One Love,
Marica - Overdriveafter30 

Comments

  1. Amazing fit. And you wear it very well. I would color block the waist band but that's just me. The fabric gives a fantastic look on you. Maybe they are listening and will someday use sewers on their covers.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes the color block would be amazing but only found the fabric in one color. Saw the color block version on Keke Palmer. Yes one day I hope the pattern companies will use sewist on their covers.

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