Skip to main content

Summer of T-Shirts Event: Raglan Sleeves

This week's post is by Tereza from the blog, Sewing for Me. She will be taking you through the steps of turning a basic t-shirt into a raglan sleeve tee. 


Sometimes I get tired of starting the fitting process with new patterns, so I decided to learn pattern drafting. Personally, reading through the books was overwhelming and intimidating. I decided to start with pattern modifications to patterns I've used before rather than with blank paper. This mid-point has proved a great learning step for me and has still taught me some great drafting principles.

For this project, I began with my favorite t-shirt pattern-StyleArc's Adele Tunic. It is a basic tee with an asymmetrical hem, set-in sleeves, and an optional neckband.




To change a basic sleeve to a raglan sleeve, you'll need a straight edge ruler, tracing paper, a pencil, several markers in different colors, and pattern weights.



I start a project like this by tracing off a copy of my original pattern, so I don't lose a TNT pattern. Personally, I like using large pieces of tracing paper that I can easily purchase at the chain craft stores. I started with the pencil, then marked my changes with a colored pen so I could keep track of my changes. I also added to the .25" seam allowance to give me adjustment room just in case.


Step 1: measure off 1" below the armhole on the shirt front, back, and sleeve. This will lower the armhole seam. Because of the change to the armholes and sleeves, this adjustment allows for movement.




Step 2: Measure off 1.25" from the CF and CB on the front and back pieces. This will be the upper edge of the raglan seam.

Step 3: I used the sleeve notches as a measurement point to keep it easy. Mark a dot .5" above the notches on the front, back, and sleeve pieces. These are the lower edge of the raglan seam.


Step 4: Connect the dots on the front and back piece with your straight edge. Then cut along the line you just made.




Step 5: Now you will match the dots to attach these new pieces to the sleeve head. It might be helpful to remove the seam allowances if you want. You will notice that during this step you do lose some of the sleeve head. Be careful to line up seams at the dots!


Step 6: Finally, you need to add the seam allowances to the front and back pieces. I also like to mark the new seam lines with the sleeve head dart that takes the job of the shoulder seam.

I also like to visually double check the seams to make sure that I didn't add anything that shouldn't be there. Then I made a sample! I'm glad I did, because I made an odd angle on the back piece. It was easy to fix, first by stitching a new line on the sample and smoothing out the seam lines on the pattern pieces.



Once I refined the fit and decided I liked the placement of the seams with the sample, I cut into my fashion fabrics. Here's how I stitched it up.
1) Stitch darts in sleeve heads.
2) Stitch sleeve backs to back, right sides together.



3) Stitch sleeve fronts to front, right sides together.

4) Stitch sleeve seam and side seam in one step.

5) Stitch/stretch neckband to finish neckline.
6) Hem sleeves and bottom hem the amount included in the pattern. Press and enjoy!





Every Monday throughout the summer, we will share with you a pattern hack on a t-shirt pattern.

Don't forget you can sew along with us at home. Share you t-shirt pattern hacks (new ideas you have and ideas that we have shared with you) on Facebook and Instagram using #FMSummerofTshirtsAt the end of the summer, we will compile all the people that used the hashtag and you will be entered into a random drawing for $75 gift certificate to Fabric Mart!

We've also put together a t-shirt inspiration board on Pinterest. Check it out HERE.

Comments

  1. Wow, that was very interesting. You gave good instructions with your steps. I doubt I will ever be making that adjustment but you gave me something to think about. I've been sewing since I was 13 but moved on to quilts for the past 20 years. Want to pick up sewing for myself again so I will stick to fitting patterns. But I really enjoyed reading this. Thanks. Your tee turned out real nice.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Very nice! I love the colors and the fit. You look great!

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Thanks for leaving a comment! All comments are reviewed before posting to help us eliminate spam. Your comment will be posted within 24 hours.

Popular Posts You Might Like

Made By A Fabricista: Fall Capsule Wardrobe with Pattern Emporium

Hello fellow fabric lovers! At long last the very best of all seasons has commenced and I'm ready to embrace the impending chill. When Fabric Mart held their sale for 65% off knits (!) I had a ridiculously fun time curating a little collection for myself to sew into a wardrobe that would be perfect for both warm and cool days since fall likes to tease with temperature changes. Can you even believe this whole stack (and thread!!) came in just under $50?! Mind blown. I wear a lot of light wovens in summer to keep cool, and switching to more cozier knits really marks a welcome change in my wardrobe.  There are many designers I simply adore, but the reason I chose Pattern Emporium's patterns for this project is because the garments are already created to pair well with many other designs in the collection. Since I've previously sewn all of these particular items and own just about the entire expanse of PE's patterns, this was a relatively easy decision and I had no doubts a

Made By A Fabricista: A Designer-Inspired Jacket in an Embroidered Silk Suiting

Hello my sewing friends!   When September rolls around many of us look forward to wearing cozy sweaters while sipping pumpkin spice lattes. However, I live in a warm ­weather state – umm, scratch that – I live in a hot weather state, and I wear layering pieces rather than cozy sweaters. Like this jacket! Vogue 1831 is a Gucci-inspired jacket pattern that was released a few months ago. The fully lined jacket looks like a basic jacket from the front, but turn around and you’ll find an inverted pleat with an adorable bow detail! I wanted to sew this jacket to wear with jeans and when I saw this embroidered silk suiting, I knew I’d found my fabric. There is a gold metallic swirl embroidered into the fabric that glitters slightly when the light hits those threads.  Trust me, the photos don’t capture the beauty of this fabric. Although this fabric was listed as dry-clean, I preshrunk it in the machine using a gentle cycle with a cold wash and cold rinse.  I placed it in the dryer on low heat

Made By A Fabricista: Chanel Inspired Boucle Jacket

I've always admired the iconic look of a Chanel Boucle Suit Jacket. The Chanel Jacket style is versatile and classic. Over its rich 100-year life span, the jacket has appeared with collars, zippers, buttons, pockets, trim, fringe, and many other variations. It is worn by everyone from movie stars, royalty, first ladies, and just everyday women. Why? Because the luxurious silhouette, boucle fabric, and tailored fit look great on everyone! Having admired the Chanel Boucle Suit Jacket for most of my life, I set out to acquire one. After a few Google searches for Chanel jackets and a glaringly steep $6,000 price tag (believe it or not, that was for pre-owned Chanel.) I knew the only way I'd ever wear a jacket like that is if I made one. Enter in $50 of fabric from Fabric Mart, $30 in notions, a $10 sewing pattern, and my Chanel dreams could become a reality.  I started my Chanel look-a-like jacket by researching sewing patterns that would help me capture that iconic look. I wanted