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Made By A Fabricista: Layering Basics


Hi Fabricistas! I am loving the recent dip in our temperatures where I live and I hope you are enjoying the seasonal weather in your neck of the woods.  I am a huge fan of layering, especially cardigans and long sleeve tops.  I recently came across an article that mentioned fashion designers are tending toward layering as a visual cue that people are trying to protect themselves from harsh cultural and social climates.  Just a fact of interest, and I wish I remembered where I read it but it stuck with me and I think there must be some truth to the idea.  I know I definitely layer because its comfy and soothing.



Anyway on to the fabric and patterns!  That's what your here for after all.  The first top I am wearing is the True Bias Patterns Nikko Top.  It is currently sold out on the Fabric Mart site but I bet they'll be restocking soon.

I must say that although this pattern looks unassuming, I love it, really love it.  I have tried various turtleneck patterns and had some mixed results, especially with the collar.  The Nikko turned out perfectly the first time, I was surprised.  Its snug, so be sure to check your stretch percentage (I was making a fourth Nikko and didn't check the stretch percentage and cannot get the top over my head..grrr so I'll have to figure out a solution later).




This black floral version has a slight bishop sleeve which is a hack that I really wanted to try.  I simply googled bishop sleeve, looked at a draft of one and eyeballed the whole thing when altering the pattern.  I think it turned out great.  I added a cuff to the end of the sleeve.  It dresses the top up a smidge and is a fun variant.  The fabric for this top and my striped version below are from some pre-cuts purchased last winter.  They are perfect for the Nikko, maybe you have some pre-cut rayon jersey sitting around and have wondered what to make with it, the Nikko is a great pairing.  


This spotted version is from a fabric I spotted on the Fabric Mart site and was really curious about, it looked so interesting and peaked my curiosity.  So of course I had to try it out on the Nikko.  Sometimes sewing is a great hobby just for the element of experimentation.  There's still a few yards of it left here.  It has great stretch and recovery and is spongy in texture.  The puckers help trap warmth around your body so its quite warm even without a layer on top.
 



My final top (but not my last one from this pattern) is the Sew House Seven Tabor V-neck and it appears to be sold out as well.  This pattern wasn't as quick to churn out at the Nikko so I only completed one (I have a different one already cut out).  I love that the sleeves are snug since that makes them ideal for fitting under a cardigan.  The body is roomy and I love the depth of the v neck.  its not too revealing but still frames your face nicely which makes it very work appropriate for me.

Its made up in a wool jersey that's on the thin side, purchased some time ago.  If you want a similar fabric I think this wool sweater knit would work well.  You will need to check the stretch percentage since its a little different from the Nikko.  You want the snug sleeves to stretch but not so much that it alters the rest of the top.  Also the stretch percentages and knit types are different for the sweater and t-shirts so be sure to check that as well.  I love that you can get so many looks from one pattern and I will be making several of the t-shirts when our weather turns warm. 


On a side note, my dog always cracks me up with his persistent curiosity.  Whenever I take photos he just can't help himself, he has to get a closer look at what I'm doing.  I call him the sewing inspector. 



Thanks so much for reading and I hope you are having fun sewing for your seasonal weather changes too!  Layering basics are so essential for me in my day to day and I hope you've been inspired to sew your own.
Happy Sewing!
Elizabeth

Comments

  1. I like all of your Nikko versions. I will have to check out this pattern. All your tops look great and perfect for cooler weather!

    ReplyDelete
  2. I love the added bishop sleeve, and the puckered knit is really interesting! Layering tops are always the things I'm adding or looking for/resolving to make more of! How smart of you to make up a collection of them! You'll be set!

    ReplyDelete
  3. All look very nice on you. Kudos!

    ReplyDelete

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